In a party-line 50-48 vote Thursday, senators approved a resolution to undo sweeping privacy rules adopted by the Obama-era Federal Communications Commission. Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Kynny/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich holds the Congressional Compliance Bill, which was the first bill passed by the 104th Congress after the "Republican Revolution" of 1994. Then-Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas is at right. Denis Paquin/AP hide caption

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Denis Paquin/AP

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, shown in 2013, is President-elect Donald Trump's pick to head the EPA. Pruitt's outspoken criticism of climate change and his close ties to the energy industry have raised concerns about his ability to lead the agency. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Former Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis, now President-elect Donald Trump's nominee to lead the Defense Department, at a 2011 congressional hearing. Chris Kleponis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Kleponis/AFP/Getty Images

Women attend the EMILY's List Breaking Through 2016 event at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia in July. Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images

President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at Cheyenne High School on Oct. 23 in North Las Vegas, Nev. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Conservative donor David Koch in a 2013 file photo. The political network he and his brother, Charles, have created is not backing Donald Trump's presidential bid this year. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

Koch Network Building A Senate Wall Against Trump

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Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., seen here in 2012, are both facing competitive elections in 2016. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

How To Lose The Senate In 82 Days

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