Ruby Corado, second from right, and Selena Cruz whip their hair around playfully while joking with Lazema Mills, left, and Giselle Gartzog, right, at Casa Ruby, a drop-in and service center for transgender people in Washington, D.C. Through the center, Corado helps people find housing, medical care and get food. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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Trans In Transition: Finding Friends And Community In D.C.

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A group of mothers and infants celebrate a recent graduation from the Harlem Children's Zone Baby College program. Marty Lipp/Courtesy of Harlem Children's Zone hide caption

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Boosting Education For Babies And Their Parents

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Phillip Underwood and Michelle Sheridan and their children, Logan and Lilliana, gather in their living room in Frederick, Md., after a long day of work and school. The couple had delayed marriage, in part for financial reasons. James Clark/NPR hide caption

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For More Millennials, It's Kids First, Marriage Maybe

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Lindolfo Carballo, an immigrant from El Salvador, meets his son, Raynel, outside school. In El Salvador, he says, families often "teach their boys one thing and their girls differently." He's trying to set a different example for his children. Sarah Tilotta for NPR hide caption

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To Model Manhood, Immigrant Dads Draw From Two Worlds

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Alcohol: a key babyproofing product for this little mother. Illustration by Daniel M.N. Turner/Photos via istockphoto.com hide caption

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Why A Teen Who Talks Back May Have A Bright Future

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A Kansas City family prepares a meal together. A new study finds that working mothers log more hours — and get more stressed — than working fathers while multitasking at home. (This family wasn't part of the research.) Allison Long/MCT /Landov hide caption

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Listen to this story on 'Morning Edition'

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