Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said Mosaic Life Care in St. Joseph, Mo., "deserves credit" for forgiving debts of former low-income patients, but he said that result should not have required congressional and press attention. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Puerto Rico faces a financial crisis with a debt of $72 billion. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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As Debt Talks Hit An Impasse, What's Next For Puerto Rico?

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Harold Pollack's index card of finance tips. Harold Pollack hide caption

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Can The Best Financial Tips Fit On An Index Card?

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Puerto Rico's governor, Alejandro Javier Garcia Padilla, shown here in an appearance in Washington this month, has been urging Congress to allow the commonwealth to seek bankruptcy protection. Sait Serkan Gurbuz/AP hide caption

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Radwan Mahmoud, a Syrian refugee, works as a laborer on a construction site in Lebanon. He's supporting 12 family members and earning about $16 a day. With a population of just over 4 million, Lebanon is host to more than 1 million Syrian refugees. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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As War Drags On, Syrian Refugees In Lebanon Sink Into Debt Trap

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A woman looks on at the U.S. Capitol in 2013 after the most recent government shutdown. Congress has made no progress toward avoiding a government shutdown when it will run out of funding Sept. 30. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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In the years before the Great Recession, many Americans piled up too much credit card debt. Now, they seem to be a little wiser about using plastic, says Richard Cordray, who heads the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Watchdog: Consumers 'More Responsible' With Credit Card Debt

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Alyson Hurt and Paige Pfleger/NPR

From The Silents To Millennials, Debt Burdens Span The Generations

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In 22 states, people who default on their student loans can have professional licenses suspended or revoked. The percentage of Americans who default on student loans has more than doubled since 2003. Butch Dill/AP hide caption

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States Review Laws Revoking Licenses For Student Loan Defaults

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Construction workers in Washington, D.C., in December. The latest jobs report will further drive the "misery index" to its lowest level in more than half a century. But economists say meager wages and big debts are still problems. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman wrapped in a Greek flag makes her way in to a demonstration to support the new anti-austerity government in Athens on Thursday. Louisa Goulimaki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In A Twist, Greeks Demonstrate In Favor Of Their Government

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Heartland Regional Medical Center in St. Joseph, Mo., is changing its name to Mosaic Life Care. It was the focus of an NPR and ProPublica investigation into its billing practices. Steve Hebert for ProPublica hide caption

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Senator 'Astounded' That Nonprofit Hospitals Sue Poorest Patients

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Keith Herie is swamped in debt from medical issues he and his wife encountered starting about a decade ago. Heartland hospital is seizing 10 percent of his paycheck and 25 percent of his wife's wages, and has placed a lien on their home. Steve Hebert for ProPublica hide caption

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When Nonprofit Hospitals Sue Their Poorest Patients

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