A man crosses a bridge over the Poudre River, in Fort Collins, Colo. The picturesque river is the latest prize in the West's water wars, where wilderness advocates usually line up against urban and industrial development. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz attend the Colorado Republican Convention in Colorado Springs on April 9. Jason Connolly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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See Where Women Have The Most And Least Political Representation In The U.S.

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A voter marks a ballot for the New Hampshire primary Feb. 9 inside a voting booth at a polling place in Manchester, N.H. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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Independent Voters In Colorado, Florida And Arizona

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A budtender prepares an edible sale for a customer at LivWell Broadway in Denver. Craig F. Walker/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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A group of community leaders from Denver's Westwood neighborhood toured the Waterton Canyon Reservoir in late October, to learn how the city's water is filtered and treated. Courtesy of Cavities Get Around hide caption

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Selling The Health Benefits Of Denver's Tap Water — After Flint

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Dr. Irene Aguilar, a Democrat and Colorado state senator from Denver County, is also a medical internist and advocate of universal health care. She led this Denver rally in favor of the 2016 ballot measure. John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Coloradans Will Put Single-Payer Health Care To A Vote

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Nasya Fair and her son Korbyn, 4, look at a growing memorial for the Colorado Springs, Colo., shooting victims. Colorado and California are the latest states at the center of the gun control debate. Brent Lewis/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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From Colorado To California, The Gun Control Debate Has Become Personal

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Rick and Letha Heitman, of Centennial, Colo., bought their health plan in 2015 through Colorado HealthOP, an insurance cooperative that will close at the end of the year. HealthOp's CEO says the co-op was "blindsided" when some promised federal subsidies failed to materialize. John Daley/CPR News hide caption

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Many Health Co-Ops Fold, Others Survive Startup Struggles

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At 72, Robert McSherry says he's not yet ready to quit driving or ready to plan how he'll get around when that time arrives. But he's happy to get the insurance discount that comes with taking a driver safety class. John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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It's Never Too Soon To Plan Your 'Driving Retirement'

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A black-footed ferret looks out of a crate during a release of 30 of the animals at a former toxic waste site, now a wildlife refuge in suburban Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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Partygoers attend a Prohibition-era themed New Year's Eve party celebrating the start of retail pot sales, at a bar in Denver on Dec. 31, 2013. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Awesome Tips, Dude: Denver May Allow Pot In Bars, Restaurants

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Marilyn Kruse couldn't get health insurance through her job as a substitute teacher in Jefferson County, Colo. Now she buys insurance through the state's health exchange. John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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In Colorado, More People Are Insured But Cost Remains An Issue

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Contaminated wastewater is seen at the entrance to the Gold King Mine in San Juan County, Colo., in this picture released by the Environmental Protection Agency. The photo was taken Wednesday; the plume of contaminated water has continued to work its way downstream. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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James Holmes, seen during his initial court appearance after the theater shooting spree in 2012, has been sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. RJ Sangosti/AP hide caption

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Jury Begins Debating Whether Colorado Should Execute Theater Shooter

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In this image taken from video, James Holmes (upper far left) listens to defense attorney Daniel King give closing arguments during Holmes' trial in Centennial, Colo., on Tuesday. Holmes was found guilty Thursday of first-degree murder in the deaths of 12 people at a Colorado theater. Colorado Judicial Department /AP hide caption

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Jury Rejects Insanity Defense For Theater Shooter, Who May Get Death Penalty

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