The Rev. Josephine Falls handed out stickers to voters while accepting ballots inside the Denver Elections Division offices on Tuesday. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piscotty/Getty Images

Colorado state Rep. Lois Court consoles Carol Stork after her 2015 testimony about the death of her terminally ill husband, during a legislative hearing on a proposal to offer life-ending medication to such patients. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Ruby Lortie (center, wearing black), marches to get out the vote with other fifth-grade students from Boulder Community School of Integrated Studies in Boulder, Colo. Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio

These Fifth-Graders Think It's Really, Really Important That You Vote

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Ana Temu of Colorado Latinos Rise, a progressive political action committee, says her campaign polled over 17,000 Latino voters this year about issues that matter to them. Meredith Turk/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Meredith Turk/Colorado Public Radio

Colorado Votes On A Ballot Measure To Make It Harder To Pass Ballot Measures

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Matt Larson, shortly after his brain surgery, with his wife, Kelly. Larson says he would like the option to end his life rather than face a painful death. Courtesy of Matt Larson hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Larson

For months, Security, Colo., resident Brenda Piontkowski has regularly visited this vending station to collect drinking water for her family. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

Chemicals In Drinking Water Prompt Inspections Of U.S. Military Bases

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Water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds in August 2015 that were built to contain heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident in Colorado. That site, and 47 others in southwest Colorado, were declared Superfund sites on Wednesday. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., and Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., seen here in 2012, are both facing competitive elections in 2016. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

How To Lose The Senate In 82 Days

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"I believe that health care is a right, not a privilege," Sen. Bernie Sanders told Denver supporters in February. ColoradoCare supporters hope to leverage his charisma for a win on their state amendment. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Piscotty/Getty Images

Campaign For Universal Health Care In Colorado Seeks Bernie Sanders' Help

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In 2016, Mesa Verde National Park officials closed Spruce Tree House because of crumbling rock. Previous restoration efforts and more extreme temperature swings, which may be connected to climate change, are two reasons why the staff here thinks rock is crumbling. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

To Preserve History, A National Park Preps For Climate Change

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A service station on Main Street in downtown Hugo, a tiny agricultural outpost on eastern Colorado's high plains, sits abandoned in 2011. The town is not home to any commercial marijuana growers or sellers, though pot is legal in Colorado. Ed Andrieski/AP hide caption

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Ed Andrieski/AP