Kelly Blake, agricultural education teacher at Fleming School, learns how to protect herself from an attack with the help of local police officer Graham Dunne. Jenny Brundin/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Jenny Brundin/Colorado Public Radio

These Teachers Are Learning Gun Skills To Protect Students, They Say

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On May 4, workers dismantle the charred remains of a house in Firestone, Colo., where an unrefined gas line leak explosion killed two people in April. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

'They're Everywhere': Oil, Gas Wells Dot Developments, Raising Potential Dangers

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K.K. DuVivier stands by a smart meter that sends electricity back to her utility, Xcel Energy. The Denver home gets credits from Xcel for power that's added back to the grid. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

As Rooftop Solar Challenges Utilities, One Aims For A Compromise

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What remains of the home of O.T. Jackson, the founder of Dearfield, Colo., sits on the town site in rural Weld County. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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For three years recreational pot has been legal in Colorado, but using it in public is still against the law. That will change this summer when pot cafes are slated to open. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

As Colorado Gets Ready To Allow Pot Clubs, Indoor Smoking Still An Issue

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The Supreme Court ruled on Tuesday that when there is clear evidence of racial bias during jury deliberations, they can be unsealed by a court to investigate whether the defendant's rights were violated. Joe Burbank/AP hide caption

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The state Capitol in Denver in December. The Grand Junction Sentinel has threatened to sue state Sen. Ray Scott after the lawmaker accused the paper of spreading "fake news." Chris Schneider/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Beverly Kurtz and Tim Guenthner live near Gross Reservoir outside Boulder, Colo. They oppose a an expansion project that would raise the reservoir's dam by 131 feet. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

High Demand, Low Supply: Colorado River Water Crisis Hits Across The West

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The Rev. Josephine Falls handed out stickers to voters while accepting ballots inside the Denver Elections Division offices on Tuesday. Marc Piscotty/Getty Images hide caption

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Colorado state Rep. Lois Court consoles Carol Stork after her 2015 testimony about the death of her terminally ill husband, during a legislative hearing on a proposal to offer life-ending medication to such patients. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Ruby Lortie (center, wearing black), marches to get out the vote with other fifth-grade students from Boulder Community School of Integrated Studies in Boulder, Colo. Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio

These Fifth-Graders Think It's Really, Really Important That You Vote

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Ana Temu of Colorado Latinos Rise, a progressive political action committee, says her campaign polled over 17,000 Latino voters this year about issues that matter to them. Meredith Turk/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Meredith Turk/Colorado Public Radio

Colorado Votes On A Ballot Measure To Make It Harder To Pass Ballot Measures

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