Some 55 percent of families with kids that receive food stamp benefits are earning wages. The problem is, those wages aren't enough to actually live on. Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and celebrity chef Tom Colicchio discuss the farm bill as part of the Plate of the Union campaign on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Food Policy Act hide caption

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Celebrity Chef Tom Colicchio: 'We Can End Hunger In This Country'

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Kara Dethlefsen, an active-duty Marine, attends the monthly food pantry at the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base near San Diego. Her husband is also a Marine. She says the food assistance is helping them get ready for his transition back to civilian life. The couple has a 4-month-old daughter. Dorian Merina/KPCC hide caption

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Volunteers gather bags of groceries for people seeking assistance at a food pantry in Concord, Mass. Many groups that help low-income families get food aid say they've seen an alarming drop recently in the number of immigrants applying for help. Yoon S. Byun/Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

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Deportation Fears Prompt Immigrants To Cancel Food Stamps

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The Number Of Hungry And Homeless Students Rises Along With College Costs

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A sign sits on a sidewalk outside the Interfaith Food Pantry at Emmanuel Baptist Church in February in Albany, N.Y. Congress may be under more pressure than usual to cut safety net spending — health care, housing assistance, welfare and food aid — to help pay for Trump's tax cut plans. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Anti-Poverty Advocates Brace For How Trump Will Fill In Policy Blanks

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Amber Lakin (front) and colleague Julia Porras work at Central City Concern, an organization that does outreach and job training to combat homelessness and addiction in Portland, Ore. Lakin went through the welfare system and now works with Central City Coffee, an offshoot of the main organization, which uses coffee roasting/packaging as a job training space. Leah Nash for NPR hide caption

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20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

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Angela Dominguez works for the Income Support Division in Portales, N.M. She's a whistleblower who spoke out about the practice of changing food stamps applications. Marisa DeMarco/KUNM hide caption

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New Mexico Defrauds The Poor Out Of Food Stamps, Whistleblowers Say

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Nearly one-third of households on SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, still have to visit a food pantry to keep themselves fed, according to USDA data. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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The federal food stamps program is working to make sure low-income Americans are getting enough calories, but those calories are less nutritious than what everyone else eats, research finds. The USDA is funding programs to try to bridge that gap, such as initiatives that allow food stamp recipients to use their benefits at farmers markets. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

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Several states are considering measures restricting how welfare benefits can be used. In Kansas, a bill on the governor's desk will bar recipients from spending their benefits on movies, swimming or casinos, or from withdrawing more than $25 per day from ATMs. Brownie Harris/Corbis hide caption

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On Welfare? Don't Use The Money For Movies, Say Kansas Lawmakers

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A new budget plan that calls for turning food stamps into a block grant program for states could affect stores that accept food stamps through an Electronic Benefits Transfer, or EBT, system like this one in Memphis. Thomas Hawk/Flickr hide caption

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Both Parties Agree The Food Stamp Program Needs To Change. But How?

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These wooden tokens are handed out to shoppers who use SNAP benefits to purchase fresh produce at the Crossroads Farmers Market near Takoma Park, Md. Customers receive tokens worth twice the amount of money withdrawn from their SNAP benefits card — in other words, they get "double bucks." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How 'Double Bucks' For Food Stamps Conquered Capitol Hill

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