crime crime

A Chinese police officer poses with Chinese tourists in front of Milan's cathedral on May 3. Chinese police are on patrol with Italian officers to help make Chinese visitors feel safer. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Antonio Calanni/AP

Chinese Cops In Italy? Joint Patrols Aim To Ease Chinese Tourists' Jitters

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Even as violent crime and property crime rates are falling, many Americans are choosing to arm themselves for safety reasons. RonBailey/Getty Images hide caption

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RonBailey/Getty Images

Does Carrying A Pistol Make You Safer?

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President Bill Clinton speaks about his crime bill to police officers at the Justice Department in April 1994. This week, Clinton defended the measure, which has been criticized by Black Lives Matter protesters. Joshua Roberts/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/AFP/Getty Images

Fake passports and the tools used to make them are displayed at the immigration bureau in Bangkok on Wednesday after Thai police broke up a major fake passport ring led by an Iranian known as "The Doctor." Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

These pit bull puppies in St. Louis were among the hundreds seized across seven states in 2009 in the largest dogfighting raid in U.S. history. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Along With Assault And Arson, FBI Starts To Track Animal Abuse

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Researchers used cotton swabs to sample bacteria and other microbes from the skin of donated corpses placed in a field in Huntsville, Texas. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Tiny Witnesses: Microbes Can Tell When A Murder Victim Died

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"As far as I know ... there is no problem of over-incarceration for rich, white financial or environmental executives," defense lawyer Jeffrey Robinson of the American Civil Liberties Union said. Aleksandar Dancu/iStock hide caption

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Aleksandar Dancu/iStock

President Obama is the first sitting president to visit a federal prison. Kevin Lamarque/Landov hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Landov

Pell Grants For Prisoners: An Old Argument Revisited

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Janice Bellucci, a lawyer, and Frank Lindsay serve on the board of directors of California Reform Sex Offender Laws, which advocates on behalf of registered sex offenders like Lindsay. Chloe Prasinos/NPR hide caption

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Chloe Prasinos/NPR

For Registered Sex Offenders, An Uphill Civil Rights Battle

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Attorney General Loretta Lynch speaks about a federal crackdown on Medicare fraud. With her are HHS Inspector General Daniel R. Levinson (from left), HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, FBI Director James B. Comey and Assistant Attorney General for the Criminal Division Leslie R. Caldwell. T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images hide caption

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T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images

Oakland police officers, wearing body cameras, form a line during demonstrations against recent incidents of alleged police brutality nationwide. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

California Bill Could Limit Police Access To Body Camera Footage

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Dallas Mildenhall, New Zealand's forensic pollen expert, peers at samples through a microscope. Courtesy of David Wolman hide caption

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Courtesy of David Wolman

Solving Crimes With Pollen, One Grain Of Evidence At A Time

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Detective Mark Williams (right) speaks with an officer in Richmond, Va. A decade ago, amid a surge in violent crime, Richmond police were identifying relatively few murder suspects. So the police department refocused its efforts to bring up its "clearance rate." Alex Matzke for NPR hide caption

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Alex Matzke for NPR

Open Cases: Why One-Third Of Murders In America Go Unresolved

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Oklahoma's Buddy Hield (right) and Denzel Valentine of Michigan State played in Friday's East Regional Semifinal of the 2015 NCAA tournament in Syracuse. If you've got money riding on this year's NCAA tournament, you might want to hear about what happened to John Bovary's football pool. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

The Cautionary Tale Of A Big-Time Bracket Bust

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In December, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio met with youth offenders at alternative housing on Rikers Island. A new state proposal would spare teens younger than 18 from serving time in adult prisons. Susan Watts/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Susan Watts/ASSOCIATED PRESS

In New York, Support Grows For Keeping Teens Out Of Adult Prisons

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Some of the artifacts that were handed over to Iraq during a ceremony Monday in Washington, D.C. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

U.S. Returns Dozens Of Looted Artifacts To Iraq

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Some colleges and police departments are starting to use software that scans social media to identify local threats, but most tips still come from members of the public. Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ikon Images/Getty Images

Awash In Social Media, Cops Still Need The Public To Detect Threats

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