A smoker in San Francisco holds a cigarette. If Gov. Jerry Brown signs the bill, California will become the second state to raise the age limit for buying tobacco products from 18 to 21. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her daughter, Brittany Maynard, as she receives congratulations from Ellen Pontac, after a right-to die measure was approved by the state Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015, in Sacramento, Calif. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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2-4-6-8, A 401(k) Would Be Great: Calif. Law Makes Cheerleaders Employees
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Fields of carrots are watered March 29, 2015, in Kern County, Calif. Subsidized water flowing in federal and state canals down from the wet north to the arid south helped turn the dry, flat plain of the San Joaquin Valley into one of the world's most important food-growing regions. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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California Farmers Gulp Most Of State's Water, But Say They've Cut Back
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Morning traffic makes its way toward downtown Los Angeles along the Hollywood Freeway, past an electronic sign warning of severe drought. California Gov. Jerry Brown introduced the state's first mandatory water reduction measure this week. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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