Care to visit the statue of Genghis Khan in front of Ulaanbaatar's Parliament House? Better direct your steps to Undulations.Cheer.Androids. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Welcome To Mongolia's New Postal System: An Atlas Of Random Words

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A map by cartographer Andy Woodruff shows the coastlines around the world from which you could "see" Australia and Oceania, if you could follow your gaze around the Earth's curvature. Courtesy of Andy Woodruff hide caption

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With 'Paper Towns,' Author John Green Reopens Search For Agloe, N.Y.

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Can you find Australia and Canada? The cartogram scales each country's geographic area by its population. (Click through to see a high-resolution map.) Original work courtesy of Paul Breding. Copyright 2005, ODTMaps.com, Amherst, MA. Adapted by Reddit user TeaDranks hide caption

toggle caption Original work courtesy of Paul Breding. Copyright 2005, ODTMaps.com, Amherst, MA. Adapted by Reddit user TeaDranks

A Google Maps image from its Russian service depicts Crimea (bottom center) with a solid line, reflecting an international border between it and Ukraine. Versions of the map on other Google sites show it with a dotted line. Google Maps hide caption

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A detail of a map from Food: An Atlas that shows sources of food found at farmer's markets in Berkeley, California. Cameron Reed/Food: An Atlas hide caption

toggle caption Cameron Reed/Food: An Atlas