U.S. men's national soccer team coach Bruce Arena watches his team during a practice session on Jan. 11, in Carson, Calif. Arena returned to the U.S. team in November to salvage its run for World Cup qualification. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

U.S. Men's Soccer Goes Back To The Future With New Coach, New Priorities

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Maracanã Stadium's turf is dry, worn and filled with ruts and holes. Those soccer clubs that call the stadium home plan to meet and discuss how to bring Maracanã up to game-worthy shape. The question is, who will pay for the repairs? Nacho Doce/Reuters hide caption

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Nacho Doce/Reuters

Bruce Arena has been rehired to coach the U.S. Men's Soccer Team. He's previously coached the team from 1998-2006 where he posted a record of 71 wins, 30 losses and 29 draws. Alex Gallardo/AP hide caption

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Alex Gallardo/AP

Brazilian soccer star Pele displays the FIFA World Cup during its presentation in Rio de Janeiro in February 2010. Pele's World Cup winner's medals from 1958, 1962 and 1970 are up for auction. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

United States players celebrate a goal against Guatemala during the second half of a World Cup qualifying soccer match Tuesday in Columbus, Ohio. The United States beat Guatemala 4-0. Jay LaPrete/AP hide caption

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Jay LaPrete/AP

Former Honduran President Rafael Callejas leaves federal court in New York City on Monday after pleading guilty to conspiracy charges in a wide-ranging FIFA soccer scandal. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

A soccer ball covered with flags is painted on a wall in the township of Khayelitsha, South Africa. The image of South Africa's 2010 World Cup has been shattered by allegations that its bid over a decade ago was boosted by bribes of more than $10 million to secure FIFA votes — allegations FIFA addressed in Wednesday's request for restitution. Schalk van Zuydam/AP hide caption

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Schalk van Zuydam/AP

U.S. forward Abby Wambach waves to fans at the end of a practice session Tuesday in New Orleans for Wednesday's final U.S. victory tour match, against China. Wambach will be playing in her final match with the team. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Abby Wambach of the U.S. women's national soccer team (right) stands with teammates during a practice in October. The team canceled a friendly match against Trinidad and Tobago on Sunday because of the poor state of the artificial turf. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

In this photo from July 13, 2011, Abby Wambach celebrates scoring her side's second goal during a semifinal match against France at the Women's World Cup in Germany. Wambach, the leading career scorer, male or female, in international soccer, announced her retirement from soccer today. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP