Getty Images

Why We're All Trapped In 3-D

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481137385/481137386" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The pair of galaxies NGC 1531/2, engaged in a spirited waltz, is located about 70 million light-years away toward the southern constellation Eridanus (The River). R. Gendler and J.E. Ovaldsen/ESO/IDA hide caption

toggle caption R. Gendler and J.E. Ovaldsen/ESO/IDA

Does The Size Of Space Freak You Out?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480335728/480335729" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This artist's rendering shows what the view might look like from one of the three planets orbiting an ultracool, reddish dwarf star just 40 light-years from Earth. ESO/M. Kornmesser/Nature hide caption

toggle caption ESO/M. Kornmesser/Nature

3 Strange Worlds Circling A Cool Star Might Be Prime Spots To Support Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476237960/476498771" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stephen Hawking discusses the "Breakthrough Starshot" space exploration initiative during a news conference Tuesday at One World Observatory in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize Foundation hide caption

toggle caption Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize Foundation

Stephen Hawking's Plan For Interstellar Travel Has Some Earthly Obstacles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474227319/474235604" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tina Buechner da Costa (left) hopes to become Germany's female astronaut. Claudia Kessler (right), CEO of HE Space, is organizing a campaign to send the first German woman into space. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Wanted: Female German Astronauts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470989791/471008334" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With this shot of Mount Fuji, astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted, "your majesty casts a wide shadow!" Scott Kelly/NASA hide caption

toggle caption Scott Kelly/NASA

Astronaut's Photos From Space Change How We See Earth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470143112/470194275" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A still image shows the Earth, as seen by Japanese geostationary satellites, during a total solar eclipse. University of Wisconsin-Madison / CIMSS and Japan Meteorological Agency and NOAA hide caption

toggle caption University of Wisconsin-Madison / CIMSS and Japan Meteorological Agency and NOAA

Expedition 43 NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (left) and his identical twin, Mark Kelly, pose for a photograph in 2015 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images

'Everybody Stretches' Without Gravity: Mark Kelly Talks About NASA's Twins Study

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469163874/469180943" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

CSIRO's Australia Telescope Compact Array at the Paul Wild Observatory. Alex Cherney hide caption

toggle caption Alex Cherney

In A Far-Off Galaxy, A Clue To What's Causing Strange Bursts Of Radio Waves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467975762/468070417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Albert Einstein once wrote that he was indebted to a favorite uncle for giving him a toy steam engine when he was a boy, launching a lifelong interest in science. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

Einstein Saw Space Move, Long Before We Could Hear It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466647335/466648903" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript