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Stephen Hawking discusses the "Breakthrough Starshot" space exploration initiative during a news conference Tuesday at One World Observatory in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize Foundation hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize Foundation

Stephen Hawking's Plan For Interstellar Travel Has Some Earthly Obstacles

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Tina Buechner da Costa (left) hopes to become Germany's female astronaut. Claudia Kessler (right), CEO of HE Space, is organizing a campaign to send the first German woman into space. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Wanted: Female German Astronauts

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With this shot of Mount Fuji, astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted, "your majesty casts a wide shadow!" Scott Kelly/NASA hide caption

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Scott Kelly/NASA

Astronaut's Photos From Space Change How We See Earth

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A still image shows the Earth, as seen by Japanese geostationary satellites, during a total solar eclipse. University of Wisconsin-Madison / CIMSS and Japan Meteorological Agency and NOAA hide caption

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University of Wisconsin-Madison / CIMSS and Japan Meteorological Agency and NOAA

Expedition 43 NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (left) and his identical twin, Mark Kelly, pose for a photograph in 2015 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images

'Everybody Stretches' Without Gravity: Mark Kelly Talks About NASA's Twins Study

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CSIRO's Australia Telescope Compact Array at the Paul Wild Observatory. Alex Cherney hide caption

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Alex Cherney

In A Far-Off Galaxy, A Clue To What's Causing Strange Bursts Of Radio Waves

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Albert Einstein once wrote that he was indebted to a favorite uncle for giving him a toy steam engine when he was a boy, launching a lifelong interest in science. AP hide caption

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AP

Einstein Saw Space Move, Long Before We Could Hear It

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The Smithsonian is sharing images of astronaut graffiti aboard the Apollo 11 command module, including this tribute to the spacecraft. Smithsonian Air and Space Museum hide caption

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Smithsonian Air and Space Museum

A simulation shows gravitational waves coming from two black holes as they spiral in together. S. Ossokine , A. Buonanno (MPI for Gravitational Physics)/W. Benger (Airborne Hydro Mapping GmbH) hide caption

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S. Ossokine , A. Buonanno (MPI for Gravitational Physics)/W. Benger (Airborne Hydro Mapping GmbH)

In Milestone, Scientists Detect Gravitational Waves As Black Holes Collide

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Luxembourg City, the capital of Luxembourg — shown here in 2012 — mixes the medieval and the modern. The tiny European nation is making a serious bid for the futuristic, too. Loop Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Loop Images/UIG via Getty Images

A NASA team has attached nearly all of the hexagonal segments that will together make the primary mirror for the James Webb Space Telescope (pictured are practice segments). Chris Gunn/NASA hide caption

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Chris Gunn/NASA

Massive Space Telescope Is Finally Coming Together

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