The moon appeared bigger and brighter when it went supermoon on June 23, 2013 — especially when it was seen next to objects on the horizon, such as the helicopter from the original Batman television show at the New Jersey State Fair last year. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

toggle caption Julio Cortez/AP

The Cassini spacecraft has been taking radar images of Titan for years now. This modified image of the Ligeia Mare, a sea on Titan's north pole, is a composite of some of those. NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/Cornell hide caption

toggle caption NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASI/Cornell

Astronomers thought they saw a big explosion in the nearby Andromeda galaxy. GALEX, JPL-Caltech/ NASA hide caption

toggle caption GALEX, JPL-Caltech/ NASA

The Two-Way

Rumors Of An Intergalactic Explosion Are Greatly Exaggerated

For a few hours Tuesday, cosmic storm chasers thought they'd detected a huge explosion in the Andromeda galaxy.

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An artist's rendering of Kepler-186f, the first validated Earth-size planet to orbit in the habitable zone of a distant star. T. Pyle/NASA/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech hide caption

toggle caption T. Pyle/NASA/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech

This diagram for the outer solar system shows the orbits of Sedna (in orange) and 2012 VP113 (in red). The sun and terrestrial planets are at the center, surrounded by the orbits (in purple) of the four giant planets — Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The Kuiper belt, which includes Pluto, is shown by the dotted light blue region. Scott S. Sheppard/Carnegie Institution for Science hide caption

toggle caption Scott S. Sheppard/Carnegie Institution for Science

Russian personnel are the first to meet space station crew members when they return to earth. Bill Ingalls/NASA hide caption

toggle caption Bill Ingalls/NASA

The Two-Way

Despite Diplomatic Tensions, U.S.-Russia Space Ties Persist

NASA needs Russian rockets to reach the International Space Station, and Russia needs NASA's money to help finance operations.

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