Japan's new solid-fuel rocket lifts off from the launch pad at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Uchinoura Space Center in Kimotsuki, Kagoshima prefecture, on Japan's southern island of Kyushu Saturday. Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks before Friday night's launch of the LADEE moon orbiter. The craft has run into a small technical issue, NASA says, which it will fix before it arrives at the moon next month. Carla Cioffi/NASA hide caption

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If you're in those circles, you may be able to see something in the sky late Friday night when NASA launches a rocket from its spaceport on the Virginia coast. NASA.gov hide caption

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A computer image generated by NASA shows objects orbiting Earth, including those in geosynchronous orbit at a high altitude. The objects are not to scale. NASA hide caption

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This artist rendering provided by NASA shows Voyager 1 at the edge of the solar system. AP hide caption

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Has Voyager 1 Left The Solar System?

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An artist's illustration of Kepler-22b, a planet that circles its star in the "goldilocks" zone. Ames/JPL-Caltech/NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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Kepler Space Telescope Is Beyond Repair, NASA Says

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In this rare image taken on July 19, 2013, the wide-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft has captured Saturn's rings and our planet Earth and its moon in the same frame. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute hide caption

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That little blue dot is how Earth will likely appear in a photo shot from a spacecraft that is studying Saturn. NASA/JPL-Caltech simulation hide caption

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