An artist's concept of a narrow asteroid belt orbiting a star similar to our own sun. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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Asteroid Belt May Be Just One Big Melting Pot Of Space Rocks
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The Chinese flag is seen in front of a view of the moon at Beijing's Tiananmen Square in December, when China's first moon rover touched the lunar surface. That feat was widely celebrated — but observers believe the rover has now run into serious trouble. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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China's Jade Rabbit Rover May Be Doomed On The Moon
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This composite image shows new details of the aftermath of a massive star that exploded and was visible from Earth over 1,000 years ago. Chandra X-ray Observatory Center/NASA hide caption

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Dying Stars Write Their Own Swan Songs
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Live, from the moon, it's the space weather report: Data from a lunar orbiter is being used to create a music stream that reflects conditions in space. Here, an image created by NASA "visualizers" who used data from 2010 to show the moon traveling across the sun, as happens two or three times a year. NASA/SDO/LRO/GSFC hide caption

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The Quadrantid meteor shower is seen shortly after 5 a.m. on Jan 3, 2013. This year's shower will be helped by a new moon that will keep the night sky dark. Mike Lewinski/Flickr hide caption

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The iconic "Earthrise" photo taken by astronaut Bill Anders through a window on the Apollo 8 command module on Dec. 24, 1968. Bill Anders/NASA hide caption

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On Anniversary Of Apollo 8, How The 'Earthrise' Photo Was Made
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NASA took a series of images to create this "timelapse" view of comet ISON's trip around the sun. NASA hide caption

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Comet ISON Is No More, NASA Says
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The Long March-3B carrier rocket carrying China's Chang'e-3 lunar probe blasts off from the launch pad at Xichang Satellite Launch Center in southwest China's Sichuan Province on Monday. Li Gang /Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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KABOOM! A NASA illustration of a gamma-ray burst. They occur, the space agency says, when "a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel, collapses under its own weight, and forms a black hole. The black hole then drives jets of particles that drill all the way through the collapsing star." NASA.gov hide caption

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NASA's PhoneSat, a 4-by-4-inch CubeSat satellite, will use an Android smartphone as its motherboard. It was among the 29 satellites launched Tuesday from Wallops Island, Va. Another miniature satellite, developed by high school students, also was on board. Dominic Hart/AP hide caption

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First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space
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