Immigration Immigration

U.S. lawmakers are once again weighing changes to the popular but troubled H-1B work visa. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Trump May Weigh In On H-1B Visas, But Major Reform Depends On Congress

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Lester "J.R." Packingham speaks Monday on the front steps of the Supreme Court. He was convicted of statutory rape in 2002, and arrested years later under a law barring sex offenders from social media platforms. Lauren Russell/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Russell/NPR

During a training, a line of mock immigration officials [right] face down volunteers with signs [left] simulating disrupting an immigration raid. Laura Benshoff/WHYY hide caption

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Laura Benshoff/WHYY

Plan To Disrupt Immigration Raids Will Enlist Songs And Prayers

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (from left), Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray and Mexican Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong greet each other during a news conference in Mexico City on Thursday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security chief John Kelly (from left), Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray and Mexican Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong spoke with reporters after initial meetings in Mexico City Thursday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters demonstrate as Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi lead members of Congress during a protest on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Encore Plus: Who Is A Good Immigrant, Anyway?

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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested 680 people during the first week of February. The memos call for 10,000 more ICE officers and agents as well as 5,000 more agents at U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Bryan Cox/ICE via AP hide caption

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Bryan Cox/ICE via AP

Memos signed by Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly, seen at a news conference earlier this month at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego, lay out a number of immigration-enforcement measures, such as expedited deportation proceedings for unauthorized immigrants who have been in the U.S. illegally for up to two years. Denis Poroy/AP hide caption

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Denis Poroy/AP

Lines for citizenship and other immigration services have been forming as early as 6 a.m. outside the office of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles. Parker Yesko/NPR hide caption

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Parker Yesko/NPR

Green Card Holders Worry About Trump's Efforts To Curtail Immigration

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Assistant Attorney General Kimberly Strovink, of Massachusetts Attorney General Healey's Civil Rights Division, answers calls coming into the state's hate hotline. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Massachusetts Hotline Tracks Post-Election Hate

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A street vendor makes huaraches and quesadillas on the sidewalk in the piñata district in Los Angeles. LA is the only major U.S. city where selling food on the sidewalk is illegal. President Trump's immigration policies have pushed the city council to change the law. But the devil is in the details. Camellia Tse for NPR hide caption

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Camellia Tse for NPR