Immigration Immigration

Hundreds protest President Obama's immigration policy, marching to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Phoenix in 2013. Many Latinos who supported the president have become frustrated by his administration. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ross D. Franklin/AP

Ibrahim Parlak [center] at the Cafe Gulistan, his restaurant in Harbert, Mich., during a candlelight vigil on Dec. 23, 2015. An ethnic Kurd from Turkey, Parlak came to the U.S. in 1991 and received political asylum. But U.S. immigration authorities are now trying to deport him to Turkey, which says he fought against the state in the 1980s. Courtesy of Charles Osgood Photography hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Charles Osgood Photography

A Friendly Cafe Owner In Michigan ... Or A Militant From Turkey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/468732559/470120008" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Matailong Du/NPR

The Supreme Court Ruling That Led To 70,000 Forced Sterilizations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469478098/469522640" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alfredo Trejo, 18, came to the U.S. from El Salvador in 2014 as an unaccompanied minor and now lives with his aunt in Virginia. He applied for asylum, and, like many others, he says he fled persecution from gang members in San Salvador. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Gilkey/NPR

Alfredo Trejo, 18, came to the U.S. from El Salvador in 2014 as an unaccompanied minor and now lives with his aunt in Virginia. He applied for asylum, and, like many others, he says he fled persecution from gang members in San Salvador. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
David Gilkey/NPR

Chefs at work in the kitchen of a restaurant in New York's Chinatown, circa 1940. For many Chinese, opening up restaurants became a way to bypass U.S. immigration laws designed to keep them out of the country. Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images

Pedro Figueroa, 31, reported his car stolen. When San Francisco law enforcement officers found out there was a warrant for his arrest, they called federal immigration officials. Courtesy of Jon Rodney hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jon Rodney

Man Reports Car Stolen, Ends Up In Deportation Limbo

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465278302/466898745" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The American flag, seen through the columns of the Supreme Court building, blows in the wind on Feb. 13. Jon Elswick/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Elswick/AP

On The Docket, In Limbo: Scalia's Death Casts Uncertainty On Key Cases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466752491/466783910" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patrons of the the New World Mall in Flushing ride the escalator from the food court. The Queens neighborhood has become a hot spot for northern Chinese immigrants in the past few years. The trend has brought a cultural wave of influence on the food and business markets in the community. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cameron Robert/NPR

Leaving China's North, Immigrants Redefine Chinese In New York

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463857599/464469876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama announces executive actions on U.S. immigration policy during a nationally televised address from the White House in November 2014. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent detains an immigrant in October 2015. Though the Department of Homeland Security says it is looking for recent arrivals, criminals and people with deportation orders, that hasn't reassured immigrants like Giovanni. "It's still scary," he says. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Deportations, Rumors Stir Fear Among Immigrants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463400563/463405771" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript