Immigration Immigration

Detainees at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash., gather for a Sikh prayer service. Liz Jones/KUOW hide caption

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Liz Jones/KUOW

With Religious Services, Immigrant Detainees Find 'Calmness'

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Tunde Wey gets ready to serve plantains and Jollof rice at his pop-up Nigerian dinner in the kitchen of Toki Underground, a ramen restaurant in Washington, D.C., in December 2014. Eliza Barclay/NPR hide caption

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Eliza Barclay/NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

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Marta Elsie Leveron, 19, (left) and her brother Freddy David Leveron, 18, have not seen their father since he left El Savador to work in California in 1999. A new U.S. program allows families to reunite if one parent is a legal U.S. resident. The girl in the middle is Liliana Beatriz Leveron, 16, a cousin of the other two. Her parents are in the U.S. and she's seeking to reunite with them as well. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

A Father In California, Kids In El Salvador, And New Hope To Reunite

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Family detention centers such as this one in Karnes City, Texas, could be forced to close after a judge ruled that holding children for long periods violates current standards. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Standards For Child Migrants Could Force Detention Centers To Close

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Attorney general nominee Loretta Lynch testifies on Capitol Hill in January. Lynch was confirmed by the Senate on Thursday after months of delay and partisan bickering. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP