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T. Boone Pickens, founder and chairman of BP Capital Management, participates in a discussion during a "birthday bash" last year in Oklahoma City. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Is American Oil 'Dead'? T. Boone Pickens Says Yes ... But Only For Now

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Oil rigs extract petroleum in Culver City, Calif., on May 16, 2008. Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images

Before Hollywood, The Oil Industry Made LA

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About 40 percent of Russia's food is imported. As the value of the ruble has declined, prices at grocery stores have risen. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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In Russia, The Oil Price Drop Hits Putin's Base Hard

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An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules

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An oil drilling rig near Williston, N.D., in 2014. The U.S. has joined Saudi Arabia and Russia as one of the world's top oil producers. But the benefits that many forecasters predicted have not materialized. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

The U.S. Is Pumping All This Oil, So Where Are The Benefits?

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Consumers have been benefiting from lower gas prices. Here, prices dip below $2 per gallon at an Exxon station in Woodbridge, Va., on Jan. 5. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Why Cheap Gas Might Not Be Good For The U.S. Economy

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Rob Oberg delivers oil to a home in south central Vermont. He works for Keyser Energy in Proctor, Vt., which provides heating fuel to about 5,000 customers. Nina Keck/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Nina Keck/Vermont Public Radio

Homeowners Who Played The Odds On Oil Heating Costs Lose Out

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The Tesoro Refinery at Nikiski in Kenai, Alaska, in 2008. Farah Nosh/Getty Images hide caption

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Farah Nosh/Getty Images

Alaska Faces Budget Deficit As Crude Oil Prices Slide

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The price of oil is displayed in downtown Midland, Texas, in February. Across the state, drilling budgets have been cut and companies have laid off workers. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Massive Downsizing In Oil Sector Brings Acute Pain For The Holidays

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Shell's Jack Pine Mine near Fort MacKay, Alberta. The largest trucks, called "heavy haulers," can hold 400 tons of oil sands material. It takes 2 tons to produce one barrel of oil. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Between Cheap Gas And Carbon Caps, Oil Sands Face Uncertain Fate

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After a magnitude-4.5 earthquake was recorded near Cushing in October, Oklahoma regulators ordered oil companies to shut down several disposal wells. That seemed to slow the shaking — at least for a while. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Confidence In Oil Hub Security Shaken By Oklahoma Earthquakes

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A member of the Syrian government forces stands next to a well at Jazel oil field, near the ancient city of Palmyra, after they retook the area from the Islamic State in March. U.S.-led airstrikes have targeted oil facilities run by ISIS, which, according to some estimates, earns as much as $1 million per day from oil sales. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Hitting ISIS Where It Hurts By Striking Oil Trucks

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The Shanghai-listed Yantai Xinchao Industry Co. filed a security filing over the weekend announcing it would purchase Texas oil properties for 8.3 billion yuan. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A coal-bed methane well sits abandoned in a pool of water outside Gillette, Wyo. It's more expensive than it looks to clean up. Stephanie Joyce/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Stephanie Joyce/Wyoming Public Radio

With Abandoned Gas Wells, States Are Left With The Cleanup Bill

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Ryan Peck repossesses vehicles in Corpus Christi, Texas. His business is seeing the upside of the downturn in oil prices: a spike in the number of expensive trucks bought by oilfield workers during an earlier boom. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

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Mose Buchele/KUT

Oil Market Bust Yields Unexpected Boom For Texas Repo Men

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Shoppers make their way in a Tehran bazaar. Once international sanctions are lifted, $100 billion from Iranian oil sales will be released from escrow accounts. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Lifting Sanctions Will Release $100 Billion To Iran. Then What?

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