Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin talks to reporters during Monday's press briefing at the White House. Mnuchin announced sanctions against 271 employees of Syria's Scientific Studies and Research Center. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Questions have loomed over National Security Adviser Michael Flynn's contact with a Russian diplomat in late December — and the explanation provided by the White House has changed over time. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said Tuesday that Iran's missile program is purely defensive. The U.S. announced new sanctions on individuals and companies it says support Iran's ballistic missile program. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Vahid Salemi/AP

The Moscow headquarters of Russia's domestic intelligence agency, the FSB. The U.S. Treasury Department is allowing limited interactions between U.S. companies and the agency. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Visitors look at the China-North Korea Friendship Bridge across the Yalu River from Dandong, in northeast China. A company operating from Dandong is under fresh sanctions by the U.S. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Targets Chinese Company For Supporting N. Korean Nuclear Program

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495587211/495595142" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kim Chol Ho, deputy manager of the Rajin port, in North Korea's Rason Special Economic Zone, looks out at small fishing boats. Despite stepped-up international sanctions, North Korea is still trading extensively with China. Eric Talmadge/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Talmadge/AP

The 'Livelihood Loophole' And Other Weaknesses Of N. Korea Sanctions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/493889932/494043690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (left) meets with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (right) in Vienna on Saturday. The International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, has verified that Iran has met all conditions under the nuclear deal. Kevin Lamarque/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Lamarque/AP

The state-run Iran-Khodro plant manufactures vehicles including the Peugeot 206 car, shown on a production line in 2014 near Tehran. Iran's robust auto industry was built in response to sanctions. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

When Sanctions Lift, How Will Iran Spend Its Billions?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/425247832/425512020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

American tourists, like these visitors taking a guided tour in May, still have to provide one of 12 authorized reasons — such as visiting family or engaging in humanitarian work — for travel to Cuba. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Desmond Boylan/AP

U.S.-Cuba Ties Are Restored, But Most American Tourists Will Have To Wait

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/425002186/425054396" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man walks past a poster advertising travel to Tehran, Iran, in Los Angeles on July 14. A nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers lifts some sanctions against Iran, but most U.S. sanctions will remain in place. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov

What Lifting Iran's Sanctions Means For U.S. Businesses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/423643361/423740624" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama says new sanctions will target Venezuelan figures who have helped repress human rights. Here, opposition leader Maria Corina Machado (center) marched with opponents of President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas to mark International Women's Day. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images