U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (left) meets with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (right) in Vienna on Saturday. The International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, has verified that Iran has met all conditions under the nuclear deal. Kevin Lamarque/AP hide caption

toggle caption Kevin Lamarque/AP

The state-run Iran-Khodro plant manufactures vehicles including the Peugeot 206 car, shown on a production line in 2014 near Tehran. Iran's robust auto industry was built in response to sanctions. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ebrahim Noroozi/AP
When Sanctions Lift, How Will Iran Spend Its Billions?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/425247832/425512020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

American tourists, like these visitors taking a guided tour in May, still have to provide one of 12 authorized reasons — such as visiting family or engaging in humanitarian work — for travel to Cuba. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Desmond Boylan/AP
U.S.-Cuba Ties Are Restored, But Most American Tourists Will Have To Wait
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/425002186/425054396" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man walks past a poster advertising travel to Tehran, Iran, in Los Angeles on July 14. A nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers lifts some sanctions against Iran, but most U.S. sanctions will remain in place. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov
What Lifting Iran's Sanctions Means For U.S. Businesses
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/423643361/423740624" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama says new sanctions will target Venezuelan figures who have helped repress human rights. Here, opposition leader Maria Corina Machado (center) marched with opponents of President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas to mark International Women's Day. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

President Vladimir Putin speaks in Moscow on Dec. 23. Russia's current economic crisis stems from Western sanctions and diving oil prices. Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images
Sanctions Intensify Russia's Free Fall Into Economic Crisis
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/373982116/374142476" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
The U.S. Says North Korea Ordered The Sony Hack. How Do We Respond?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/371533971/371536634" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript