A traditional fisherman in La Paz, Mexico, who works with SmartFish brings sustainable seafood to market. SmartFish was one of the competitors in last week's Fish 2.0 competition. Courtesy of Smart Fish hide caption

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When salmon was out of season, diners in restaurants were likely to get a species other than what they ordered 67 percent of the time, a new survey finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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Barbecue head-on shrimp made at Pascal's Manale. It may be hard to find head-on shrimp in cities away from the coast, so Pascal's Manale co-owner and chef Mark DeFelice came up with a shortcut. awiederhoeft/Flickr hide caption

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NOAA scientists estimate they saw about 10 billion sea scallops off Delaware and southern New Jersey this spring as part of an annual survey. Andrew Martinez/Science Source hide caption

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A 3,000-ton cargo ship at Thajeen Port in Samut Sakhon, Thailand, 15 days after it set sail from Benjina, Indonesia. The company that owns the ship said it is not involved with the fishermen. "We only carry the shipment and we are hired, in general, by clients," said owner Panya Luangsomboon. "We're separated from the fishing boats." Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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A crab pot full of snow crabs, fished out of the Bering Sea. Josh Thomas /Courtesy of WWF hide caption

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Asian carp, battered and fried. As the fish makes its unwelcome way up the Mississippi River, chefs are trying to get people to eat to beat it back. Louisiana Sea Grant/Flickr hide caption

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The Drakes Bay Oyster Farm caters to local residents and restaurants. But unless its lease is renewed, its days are numbered. Richard Gonzales/NPR hide caption

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A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.") Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A marlin caught as bycatch by the California drift gillnet fishery. The conservation group Oceana called the fishery one of the "dirtiest" in the U.S. because of its high rate of discarded fish and other marine animals. Courtesy of NOAA hide caption

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Beware of the big guys: Red snappers from tropical waters sometimes accumulate high levels of the toxin that causes ciguatera. Go for the smaller fish to avoid it. Kamel Adjenef/iStockphoto hide caption

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A sperm whale entangled in a drift net. A report says commercial fisheries around the world kill or injure 650,000 mammals a year. Alberto Romero/Marine Photobank hide caption

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With local cod so scarce, Chef Toby Hill of Lyric Restaurant in Yarmouth Port, Mass., tries out a dogfish salad — served here with garlic aioli on toast — instead. Dogfish is still plentiful in New England waters, but wholesale fisheries say there's not much demand for it in the U.S. Christine Hochkeppel/Courtesy of Cape Cod Times hide caption

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