Herring are delicious, with flaky, mild meat and oil that sizzles on their skin when grilled over a flame. Chefs and ocean advocates have been promoting the environmental and health benefits of eating small fish like this. But the case of the San Francisco Bay's herring shows some of the obstacles to spreading that message. Alastair Bland for NPR hide caption

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Chef Michael Cimarusti, of Los Angeles' Providence restaurant, is pioneering the West Coast incarnation of Dock to Dish, a program that hooks up local fishermen directly with chefs. Courtesy of Providence hide caption

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LA's Top Restaurant Charts New Waters In Sustainable Seafood

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A traditional fisherman in La Paz, Mexico, who works with SmartFish brings sustainable seafood to market. SmartFish was one of the competitors in last week's Fish 2.0 competition. Courtesy of Smart Fish hide caption

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When salmon was out of season, diners in restaurants were likely to get a species other than what they ordered 67 percent of the time, a new survey finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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Barbecue head-on shrimp made at Pascal's Manale. It may be hard to find head-on shrimp in cities away from the coast, so Pascal's Manale co-owner and chef Mark DeFelice came up with a shortcut. awiederhoeft/Flickr hide caption

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Hacking Iconic New Orleans Barbecue Shrimp Far From The Gulf

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NOAA scientists estimate they saw about 10 billion sea scallops off Delaware and southern New Jersey this spring as part of an annual survey. Andrew Martinez/Science Source hide caption

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A 3,000-ton cargo ship at Thajeen Port in Samut Sakhon, Thailand, 15 days after it set sail from Benjina, Indonesia. The company that owns the ship said it is not involved with the fishermen. "We only carry the shipment and we are hired, in general, by clients," said owner Panya Luangsomboon. "We're separated from the fishing boats." Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Was Your Seafood Caught By Slaves? AP Uncovers Unsavory Trade

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A crab pot full of snow crabs, fished out of the Bering Sea. Josh Thomas /Courtesy of WWF hide caption

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Why The White House Wants To Go After Seafood Pirates

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Asian carp, battered and fried. As the fish makes its unwelcome way up the Mississippi River, chefs are trying to get people to eat to beat it back. Louisiana Sea Grant/Flickr hide caption

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Fighting (Tasty) Invasive Fish With Forks And Knives

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The Drakes Bay Oyster Farm caters to local residents and restaurants. But unless its lease is renewed, its days are numbered. Richard Gonzales/NPR hide caption

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Fight Over Calif. Oyster Company Splits Chefs And Land Defenders

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A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.") Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A marlin caught as bycatch by the California drift gillnet fishery. The conservation group Oceana called the fishery one of the "dirtiest" in the U.S. because of its high rate of discarded fish and other marine animals. Courtesy of NOAA hide caption

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Beware of the big guys: Red snappers from tropical waters sometimes accumulate high levels of the toxin that causes ciguatera. Go for the smaller fish to avoid it. Kamel Adjenef/iStockphoto hide caption

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