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Valeant Pharmaceuticals, based in Bridgewater Township, N.J., bought two specialty heart drugs used in emergency treatment from Marathon Pharmaceuticals in 2015, and then dramatically increased each drug's price. Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Greg unwinds a hose while doing some yardwork. Along with his failing memory, Greg has been experiencing secondary symptoms including paranoia, depression and slow healing. Amanda Kowalski for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Kowalski for NPR

More Than Memory: Coping With The Other Ills Of Alzheimer's

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Juanita Milton, who suffers from COPD, uses her nebulizer with albuterol sulfate at her home in Live Oak, Texas. Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News

Many COPD Patients Struggle To Pay For Each Breath

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Adult ADHD can be difficult to diagnose. Hemant Mehta/IndiaPicture RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Hemant Mehta/IndiaPicture RF/Getty Images

Adult ADHD Can't Be Diagnosed With A Simple Screening Test, Doctors Warn

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The anti-inflammatory drug Bextra was taken off the market because it increased the risk of heart attack and stroke. Tannen Maury/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tannen Maury/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Pharmaceutical companies send "detailers" to hospitals to persuade doctors to prescribe their medications. IPGGutenberg UK Ltd/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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IPGGutenberg UK Ltd/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., listens as Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., speaks to members of the media Wednesday outside the West Wing of the White House in Washington following their meeting with President Trump. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., is one of three GOP senators seeking an investigation into six-figure annual costs for drugs intended to treat rare diseases. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Medicare accounts for about 29 percent of all spending on prescription medicines in the U.S. each year. stevecoleimages/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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stevecoleimages/iStockphoto/Getty Images

Medicare Should Leverage Buying Power To Pull Down Drug Prices, White House Says

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Heat and steam from your shower or shave can rob medicine of its potency long before the drug's expiration date. Angela Cappetta/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Cappetta/Getty Images

When Old Medicine Goes Bad

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John Evard, 70, at the Las Vegas Recovery Center last July. Evard, a retired tax attorney, checked into a rehabilitation program to help him quit the prescribed opioids that had left him depressed, groggy and dependent on the drugs. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Opioids Can Derail The Lives Of Older People, Too

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Public health officials want doctors to consider treating alcohol abuse with medications that have a track record of success. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Express Scripts assures patients it has a policy of not putting cancer medicine or mental health drugs on the list of products it excludes from its formulary. Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

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Fuse/Getty Images

Will Your Prescription Meds Be Covered Next Year? Better Check!

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

When Pregnant Women Need Medicine, They Encounter A Void

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In states that made medical marijuana legal, prescriptions for a range of drugs covered by Medicare dropped. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

An independent commission recommended changes to Medicare Part D, including reducing or waiving copayments for generic drugs for low-income enrollees. Shana Novak/Getty Images hide caption

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Shana Novak/Getty Images

Pharmacists in California will have to give women a short health consultation before providing contraceptives without a prescription. Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images

Michelle Pattengill, a technician at L&S Pharmacy in Charleston, Mo., holds a bottle of oxycodone. Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media/KBIA hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith/Side Effects Public Media/KBIA

"Everyone that's in there right now has probably done it," Clyde Polly says about Opana injections at his home. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Inside A Small Brick House At The Heart Of Indiana's Opioid Crisis

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