Ordinary spoons vary widely in size and shape. Confusing regular spoons for accurate measurements of teaspoons and tablespoons can lead to accidental overdoses. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Brian Micalizzi, a pharmacist at Children's Medical Center in Dallas, prepares an antibiotic prescribed to a patient in the emergency department. Juan Pulido/Courtesy of Children's Medical Center hide caption

itoggle caption Juan Pulido/Courtesy of Children's Medical Center

Xanax and Valium, prescribed to treat anxiety, mood disorders and insomnia, can be deadly when mixed with other sedatives. Dean812/Flickr hide caption

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Pill bottles in a locked room deep inside the building that houses the Los Angeles County Health Authority Law Enforcement Task Force. Tracy Weber/ProPublica hide caption

itoggle caption Tracy Weber/ProPublica

Unless it's strep throat, antibiotics are unlikely to help you get over a sore throat. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

They're back: Cheaper mail-order medications from Canada and other foreign lands. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

Posters like this one tell patients in New York City emergency rooms what to expect when it comes to painkiller prescriptions. New York City Health Department hide caption

itoggle caption New York City Health Department

Grapefruit can make for a tasty addition to breakfast. But it can also interfere with some medications. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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At Universal Pain Management, Dr. Francis Riegler confers with Trudy Roberts, the clinic's nurse practitioner, over a patient's record of prescription drug purchases. Sarah Varney/KQED hide caption

itoggle caption Sarah Varney/KQED

Each year, millions of Americans don't fill their prescriptions because they can't afford to. Maya Kovacheva Photography/iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption Maya Kovacheva Photography/iStockphoto.com