Native Americans Native Americans

Jon Proudstar created Tribal Force in 1996 — now, it's being rebooted by Native Realities. Ron Joseph/Weshoyot Alvitre/Native Realities hide caption

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Ron Joseph/Weshoyot Alvitre/Native Realities

With This Publisher, Native American Superheroes Fly High

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Demonstrators march in Washington, D.C., on Friday, calling on the Trump administration to meet with tribal leaders and opposing construction of the nearly complete Dakota Access Pipeline. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

A severe shortage of housing on Wind River Reservation in central Wyoming causes tribal members to look for rental properties outside their community in the town of Lander. Native Americans can face housing discrimination in their search but many are reluctant to file complaints. J. Stephen Conn/Flickr hide caption

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J. Stephen Conn/Flickr

Native Americans Struggle To Find Housing While Facing Discrimination

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A prehistoric granary overlooking Cedar Mesa, a site inside the newly created Bears Ears National Monument in Utah that is sacred to many Native American tribes. Natives still hunt and forage for food and medicine throughout the Bears Ears region. Josh Ewing/Courtesy of Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition hide caption

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Josh Ewing/Courtesy of Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition

Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP

Some of the indigenous corn varieties growing in Taylor Keen's backyard. Cherokee White is a kind of sweet corn with white, purple, and yellower kernels that is ground for flour. Green Oaxacan is processed to make hominy and corn meal. Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

Law enforcement dressed in riot gear arrest protesters who are demonstrating against construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D. Police and National Guard moved in on an encampment of tents and teepees on Thursday. Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Amy Sisk/Prairie Public Broadcasting

Tensions Escalate As Police Clear Protesters Near Dakota Access Pipeline

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Native Americans march to a sacred burial ground site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota, where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Oregon Occupation Unites Native American Tribes To Save Their Land

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Native American protestors gather at a construction site for the Dakota Access pipeline to perform a daily prayer ceremony. Over 1,000 people, most Native American, have gathered at two prayer camps along the Cannonball River near its confluence with the Missouri in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access pipeline. Andrew Cullen hide caption

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Andrew Cullen

The Chickasaw National Recreation Area used to be called Platt National Park until 1976, when it lost its status as a national park. NPS Cultural Landscapes/Flickr hide caption

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NPS Cultural Landscapes/Flickr

In Oklahoma, A National Park That Got Demoted

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The seed library maintained by the Jijak Foundation contains dozens of native varieties of corn, beans, tobacco, watermelon and ancient squash. Rebecca Williams/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Rebecca Williams/Michigan Radio

U.S. officials and members of Native American Nations attend an "emergency meeting" at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. They were gathered to object to a Paris auction house's upcoming sale of objects sacred to Native Americans. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Inyan Pedersen, 34, with her son Knowledge. Doctors scheduled Pedersen to deliver her two younger children by C-sections because the closest birthing center is two hours away. Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR

Jami Larson, 32, grew up in Pierre and is a member of the Lower Brule Sioux tribe. She is a registered nurse who specializes in diabetes care among Native Americans. Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR

This sea wall protects the Quinault Indian Nation at the mouth of the Quinault River. In March, a state of emergency was declared by the tribe when waves crashed over the wall. Larry Workman/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Larry Workman/KUOW/EarthFix

Facing Rising Waters, A Native Tribe Takes Its Plea To Paris Climate Talks

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In Wyoming, one in three Native students are what's considered "chronically absent." Educators on the Wind River Indian Reservation say that's a major factor holding back student achievement. Karl Gehring/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Gehring/Denver Post via Getty Images

Wyoming Schools Get Poor Report Card For Native American Absenteeism

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Jorje Mendez has lost more than 45 pounds through weightlifting and other lifestyle changes. Trainer Johnny Gonzales, right, helps prediabetic patients at the gym he set up at the Lake County Tribal Health Clinic in California. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED

The Wind River Reservation, pictured here, is trying to increase reports and treatment of sexual assault with new practices that encourage cultural sensitivity to better serve survivors. Karl Gehring/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Gehring/Denver Post via Getty Images

Native Americans Turn To 'Safe Stars' For Help With Sexual Assaults

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A stained-glass window depicting Father Junipero Serra in the Basilica Parish in Mission Dolores. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

Savior Or Villain? The Complicated Story Of Pope Francis' Next Saint

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