Inyan Pedersen, 34, with her son Knowledge. Doctors scheduled Pedersen to deliver her two younger children by C-sections because the closest birthing center is two hours away. Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR hide caption

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Jami Larson, 32, grew up in Pierre and is a member of the Lower Brule Sioux tribe. She is a registered nurse who specializes in diabetes care among Native Americans. Misha Friedman for KHN and NPR hide caption

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This sea wall protects the Quinault Indian Nation at the mouth of the Quinault River. In March, a state of emergency was declared by the tribe when waves crashed over the wall. Larry Workman/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Facing Rising Waters, A Native Tribe Takes Its Plea To Paris Climate Talks

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In Wyoming, one in three Native students are what's considered "chronically absent." Educators on the Wind River Indian Reservation say that's a major factor holding back student achievement. Karl Gehring/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Wyoming Schools Get Poor Report Card For Native American Absenteeism

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Jorje Mendez has lost more than 45 pounds through weightlifting and other lifestyle changes. Trainer Johnny Gonzales, right, helps prediabetic patients at the gym he set up at the Lake County Tribal Health Clinic in California. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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The Wind River Reservation, pictured here, is trying to increase reports and treatment of sexual assault with new practices that encourage cultural sensitivity to better serve survivors. Karl Gehring/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Native Americans Turn To 'Safe Stars' For Help With Sexual Assaults

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A stained-glass window depicting Father Junipero Serra in the Basilica Parish in Mission Dolores. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Savior Or Villain? The Complicated Story Of Pope Francis' Next Saint

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Same-Sex Marriage Isn't Law Of The Land From Sea To Shining Sea

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Tribal Chairman Bill Iyall stands on Cowlitz Tribe reservation land with a rendering of the casino the tribe hopes to build on the site near La Center, Washington, just north of Portland, Ore. Peter Haley/MCT/Landov hide caption

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'Location Is Everything' In Tribal Casino Dispute

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After years as punk rockers, Jeneda (right) and Clayson Benally formed the band Sihasin, which means "hope" in Navajo. "We have every possibility to make positive change," says Jeneda. Courtesy of Sihasin hide caption

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Bringing Music And A Message Of Hope To Native American Youth

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Shannon Rivers, a member of the Akimel O'odham tribe, lights a fire for the purification ceremony at the Coconino County jail. Inmates will help him put blankets over the sweat lodge structure, place heated rocks inside and pour water over them. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Many Native American Communities Struggle With Effects Of Heroin Use

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At Montana's Nkwusm Salish Language School, teacher Echo Brown works with a student learning Salish words. Luk means "wood" or "stick." Picct means "leaf" and solsi translates to "fire." Courtesy of Nkwusm Salish Language School hide caption

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Montana Offers A Boost To Native Language Immersion Programs

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Adam Sandler accepts the award for favorite comedic movie actor at the People's Choice Awards at the Nokia Theatre on Jan. 7 in Los Angeles. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Beginning April 1, all sugary beverages and food of "minimal-to-no nutritional value" sold on the Navajo reservation will incur an additional 2-cent tax. April Sorrow/Flickr hide caption

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Akutaq or agutak — also known as Eskimo ice cream — is a favorite dessert in western Alaska. It's made with berries and frothed with fat, like Crisco. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

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For Native Alaskans, Holiday Menu Looks To The Wild

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Jim Nepstad, superintendent of Effigy Mounds National Monument in northeast Iowa, stands at the top of a bluff looking over the Mississippi River. Clay Masters/NPR hide caption

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Park Service Construction Damaged Native American Burial Sites

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Native American protesters have been demonstrating against Columbus Day in Seattle for several years. Protest organizers say Columbus should not be credited with discovering the Western Hemisphere at a time when it was already inhabited. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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