Pedestrians walk through Rockefeller Center in New York City. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Asian population recently grew by 3 percent to 21.4 million and people who identified as being of two or more races grew by 3 percent to 8.5 million. Armin Rodler/Flickr hide caption

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Armin Rodler/Flickr

Census Bureau Director John Thompson's five-year term expired in December, but he had been widely expected to stay on through at least the end of this year. U.S. Census Bureau hide caption

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U.S. Census Bureau

Left to right: George Fermon (standing), Benjamin F. Fermon (seated, author's grandfather; father of children pictured), Jessie Fermon (standing, back row), Benjamin "Bizzy" Fermon (front row, white romper), Harold Fermon, (grey knee-britches suit), Jessie Amy Anderson Fermon (seated, author's grandmother; mother of children), Frances Fermon, (on Jessie Amy's lap) Gladys Fermon (standing) Courtesy of Amy Alexander/Author hide caption

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Courtesy of Amy Alexander/Author

Gender-neutral signs are posted outside public restrooms at the 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Census Bureau says it is not planning to ask about gender identity or sexual orientation in the 2020 Census. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

U.S. Postal Service mail carrier Thomas Russell holds a census form while working his route in 2010. Jason E. Miczek/AP hide caption

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Jason E. Miczek/AP

Run-Up To Census 2020 Raises Concerns Over Security And Politics

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The Census Bureau released new numbers on Tuesday showing that real median household incomes rose from $53,718 in 2014 to $56,516 last year. Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Census Bureau Tests New Online Survey In Small Towns Ahead Of 2020

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Question 9 on the first page of the 2010 Census form. After more than a century, the Census Bureau is dropping use of the word "Negro" to describe black Americans in its surveys. Instead of the term, which was popularized during the Jim Crow era of racial segregation, census forms will use "black" or "African-American." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP