Demonstrators in Chicago call for an end to gun violence and resignation of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Chicago police are under scrutiny following the release of a video showing the shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by a Chicago police officer. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Crime Spikes As Police Avoid Becoming 'The Next Viral Video'

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Egyptian mourners carry the coffin of Mohammed Darbaka, who was allegedly shot dead by a policeman over a payment dispute, during his funeral on Feb. 19 in Cairo. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Egypt, Growing Discontent Over Abuses By Police

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A mural depicting peace in Ferguson was painted on the wall of a vacant building near the city's police department. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

On Road To Recovery, Ferguson Residents Have Different Ideas

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Fired police officer Daniel Holtzclaw cries as guilty verdicts are read in an Oklahoma City court Thursday. Holtzclaw could face life in prison when he's sentenced for rape and other charges next month. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Antwan Burns-Jones, 31 (from left), William Moore, 35, and David Lee, 23, add a basketball to the memorial for Tyshawn Lee, 9, who was fatally shot in Chicago's Gresham neighborhood. Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Amid Violence, Chicago Parents Try To Inoculate Their Sons Against Fear

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Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates speaks onstage at the 2015 New Yorker Festival last month. Anna Webber/Getty Images for The New Yorker hide caption

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Anna Webber/Getty Images for The New Yorker

Ta-Nehisi Coates On His Work And The Painful Process Of Getting Conscious

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Director Quentin Tarantino attends a march to denounce police brutality in New York City on Oct. 24. At the rally, Tarantino said, "I have to call the murdered the murdered, and I have to call the murderers the murderers" — drawing considerable backlash from police unions. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Quentin Tarantino, At The Eye Of A Firestorm — And A Brewing Culture War

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After Tumultuous Year For Police And African-Americans, What's Changed?

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New York Will Pay Eric Garner Family $5.9 Million To Avoid Lawsuit

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A man walks past the damaged Oxford Tavern on April 30 in Baltimore. Richard Sung Kang's liquor store and bar was hit by looters during a riot over the police-involved death of neighborhood resident Freddie Gray. The doors and windows were broken and cash and inventory stolen, leaving shelves bare. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

For Baltimore Businesses, Aid For Riot Repair Is Not Coming Fast Enough

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Stanley Wrice pauses in December 2013 as he speaks to the media with his lawyer, Heidi Linn Lambros (left), and his daughter, Gail Lewis, while leaving Pontiac Correctional Center in Pontiac, Ill. Wrice was released after serving more than 30 years. He claimed for decades that Chicago police detectives under the command of then-Lt. Jon Burge beat and coerced him into confessing to rape. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Oakland police officers, wearing body cameras, form a line during demonstrations against recent incidents of alleged police brutality nationwide. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

California Bill Could Limit Police Access To Body Camera Footage

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Earlier this week, protesters marched for Freddie Gray through downtown Baltimore. Gray died from spinal injuries about a week after he was arrested and transported in a police van. A larger protest is planned for Saturday afternoon. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Charlotte Police Chief Rodney Monroe answers questions from the group. Lisa Wolf/WFAE hide caption

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Lisa Wolf/WFAE

In Charlotte, N.C., Police Use Simulators To Engage Community Amid Distrust

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Cellphones were used to record a 2012 confrontation between protesters and police in Springfield, Ill. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Civilians Can Record Police Encounters, But When Is It Interference?

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Ferguson activists march through downtown St. Louis during a protest last month. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Ferguson Activists Hope That Momentum Sparks A National Movement

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Yonkers community activist Hector Santiago demonstrates the "stop-and-shake" with Lt. Pat McCormack of the Yonkers Police Department. The idea, Santiago says, is to get people to introduce themselves to cops on the street. Courtesy of Hector Santiago hide caption

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Courtesy of Hector Santiago

Instead Of Stop-And-Frisk, How About Stop-And-Shake?

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Sureshbhai Patel lies in a bed at Huntsville Hospital in Huntsville, Ala., on Feb. 7. Patel was severely injured when police threw him to the ground. Chirag Patel/AP hide caption

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Chirag Patel/AP

Ala. Governor Apologizes To Indian Government In 'Excessive Force' Case

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New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton speaks during an NYPD swearing-in ceremony in New York on Jan. 7. He confirmed to NPR today that there had been a work slowdown by officers in the weeks since two police officers were shot dead. He said the matter was being corrected. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

New York Police Commissioner Confirms Work Slowdown By Officers

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There's been a sharp decline in the number of arrests and tickets and summonses issued in New York City. Police sometimes use work slowdowns to show dissatisfaction with policies, workloads or contract disputes. Justin Lane/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Justin Lane/EPA/Landov

When Morale Dips, Some Cops Walk The Beat — But Do The Minimum

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