Months after a concussion or other traumatic brain injury, you may sleep more hours, but the sleep isn't restorative, a study suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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A Concussion Can Lead To Sleep Problems That Last For Years
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Bob Woodruff in 2014. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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ABC's Bob Woodruff: The Unexpected Life
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An MRI scan shows Bryan Arling's brain from above. The white-looking fluid is a subdural hematoma, or a collection of blood, that pushed part of his brain away from the skull, causing headaches and slowing his decision-making. Courtesy of Dr. Ingrid Ott, Washington Radiology Associates hide caption

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You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong. Marko Korosec/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain
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Germany's Alexandra Popp and the U.S.'s Morgan Brian collide during a World Cup semifinal in June. Both were injured, but continued to play. Brad Smith//ISI/Corbis hide caption

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Nurses Katherine Malinak and Amy Young lift Louis DeMattio, a stroke patient, out of his hospital bed using a ceiling-mounted lift at the Cleveland Clinic. Dustin Franz for NPR hide caption

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People With Brain Injuries Heal Faster If They Get Up And Get Moving
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Seeing What Isn't There: Inside Alzheimer's Hallucinations
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Undiagnosed Brain Injury Is Behind Soldier's Suicidal Thoughts
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San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland (50) is seen here in a game last year against the New York Giants. Borland, who had two interceptions in that game, has announced that he is retiring from the NFL after his rookie season. Chris Szagola/CSM/Landov hide caption

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Former Army Sgt. Ryan Sharp sat down with his father, Kirk Sharp, to talk about what happened when Ryan returned home after two tours in Iraq. StoryCorps hide caption

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Behind A Soldier's Suicidal Thoughts, An Unknown Brain Injury
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"Dance for PD" classes use music to temporarily ease tremors and get Parkinson's patients moving. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Your Brain's Got Rhythm, And Syncs When You Think
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The Blind Woman Who Sees Rain, But Not Her Daughter's Smile
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A baby born too soon continues to develop and grow inside an incubator at the neonatal ward of the Centre Hospitalier de Lens in Lens, northern France. Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Growth Factor Heals The Damage To A Preemie's Brain — In Mice
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A technique called optogenetics is being used in the laboratory to observe and control what brain circuits are doing in real time. Henning Dalhoff/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

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Experimental Tool Uses Light To Tweak The Living Brain
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