Hackers say they took control of a Tesla Model S through the car's computers. Tesla Motors says it is updating its systems with a patch to fix the vulnerability. Tesla Motors hide caption

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Tesla Model S Can Be Hacked, And Fixed (Which Is The Real News)

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Chris Valasek (left) and Charlie Miller talk about hacking into vehicle computer systems during the Black Hat USA 2014 hacker conference in Las Vegas last August. Steve Marcus/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne has asked his counterpart at General Motors to consider a merger. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Fiat Chrysler Eyes GM For An Unlikely Merger

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Cars drive past the Kremlin along the Moscow River last December. Foreign automakers had been ramping up production in Russia, but the country's economic woes have caused car sales to drop sharply. Several foreign automakers have cut back production, and General Motors is pulling out of Russia. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Foreign Carmakers Shift Into Reverse In Russia

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The 2002 Honda CR-V is one of dozens of car models subject to a recall for faulty air bags. The air bag manufacturer, Takata, supplies bags for more than 30 percent of all cars and is one of only three large air bag suppliers. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/AP hide caption

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No Quick Fixes For Drivers Affected By Air Bag Recall

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Detroit's abandoned Packard car plant, seen here in a 2010 photo, could eventually sell for $21,000 if a development deal falls through, a Wayne County official says. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Models abound at this week's Shanghai auto show. This one, in a latex cat suit, was drawing attention to an SUV by Landwind, a Chinese company that sells about 10,000 vehicles a year. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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The 2013 Bentley Mulsanne features drop-down iPad workstations. More cars are being outfitted to operate as mobile offices. Bentley Motors hide caption

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The Next Workplace? Behind The Wheel

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Lincoln's staking its future on this car. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Can Lincoln Be Cool Again?

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Lincoln's staking its future on this car. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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377: Can Lincoln Be Cool Again?

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