Detroit's abandoned Packard car plant, seen here in a 2010 photo, could eventually sell for $21,000 if a development deal falls through, a Wayne County official says. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

toggle caption Carlos Osorio/AP

Models abound at this week's Shanghai auto show. This one, in a latex cat suit, was drawing attention to an SUV by Landwind, a Chinese company that sells about 10,000 vehicles a year. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

The 2013 Bentley Mulsanne features drop-down iPad workstations. More cars are being outfitted to operate as mobile offices. Bentley Motors hide caption

toggle caption Bentley Motors
The Next Workplace? Behind The Wheel
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/166230794/166382222" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lincoln's staking its future on this car. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Mark Lennihan/AP
Can Lincoln Be Cool Again?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/155039824/155082785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lincoln's staking its future on this car. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Mark Lennihan/AP
377: Can Lincoln Be Cool Again?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/154604951/154612520" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">