As China continues its massive economic growth, especially in cities, the government continues to severely limit people's rights. Is that system sustainable? Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

A man pushing a stroller passes parallel traders in Hong Kong distributing goods to be brought into Shenzhen, China, on Monday. China said it will limit the number of visits that residents of Shenzhen can make to Hong Kong. The move is an attempt to ease the flow of mainland visitors in the former British colony. Bobby Yip/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Bobby Yip/Reuters /Landov

A March 16 satellite image from the CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative shows one of China's artificial islands in the South China Sea. CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative/DigitalGlobe hide caption

itoggle caption CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative/DigitalGlobe

Bi Fujian, an anchor of China Central Television (CCTV), speaks during a news conference in Beijing, in 2013. Bi has publicly apologized for remarks he made at a private dinner that were critical of the late communist leader Mao Zedong. China Stringer Network/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption China Stringer Network/Reuters/Landov

Money is pouring into the stock market, but most new investors only have a middle-school education, says Texas A&M University economist Gan Li. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

With the Xi Jinping app, you can read about the Chinese president's love of soccer and his recipe for progress in reform, economic development, rule of law and party governance. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Passengers go to the Nanchang railway station in eastern China in February 2014, at the end of the Chinese New Year holiday. In the past, it was often the only time of year that migrant workers were able to return home. Now, economic pressures on factories in coastal China have led to a reversal of a decades-long migration of workers from inland to the coast. Zhou Ke/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Zhou Ke/Xinhua/Landov

Charles and his bride Xiao Fang met through a social media app where they connected by shaking their smartphones at the same time. NPR's Frank Langfitt met Charles in Shanghai and drove him 500 miles to his family's home in central China for the wedding. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

Polina, 37, rests in a hospital bed in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2011. She is severely malnourished and suffers from numerous diseases, including tuberculosis, hepatitis C and HIV. Misha Friedman hide caption

itoggle caption Misha Friedman

A sales assistant arranges handbags inside a Chanel boutique at a shopping mall in central Guangzhou, China, in February 2014. Alex Lee/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Alex Lee/Reuters/Landov

Liu Jianchao (second right), China's assistant foreign minister, shakes hands with Japanese Deputy Foreign Minister Shinsuke Sugiyama (second left) during a meeting in Tokyo, Japan on Thursday. Liu Tan/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Liu Tan/Xinhua/Landov