The train, which began its journey in Yiwu, China, pulls into a rail freight terminal on Wednesday in London, after traveling for 16 days — across about 7,456 miles and nine countries. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Face masks were placed on stone monkeys at the Beijing Zoo on Dec. 19 to protest heavy air pollution in northeast China. A week earlier, riot police cracked down after artists put similar masks on human figures in Chengdu. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad greets Chinese President Xi Jinping before a meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing in April 2013. The two first met in 1985, during a visit by Xi to Iowa. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

An 'Old Friend Of China' Prepares To Bridge Differences At A Fraught Time

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Secretary of State-designate Rex Tillerson suggested at his confirmation hearing that a Trump administration would be willing to wage a showdown over China's recent island building in the South China Sea. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

China's President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at the World Economic Forum on Tuesday in Davos, Switzerland. The global elite have begun a week of earnest debate and Alpine partying in the Swiss ski resort, in a week bookended by two presidential speeches of historic import — Xi's remarks and U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's inaugural address. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Li Chunke, a carver at the state-owned Beijing Ivory Carving factory, at work in his Beijing workshop. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In China, A Shift Away From Trade In Ivory and Shark Fins

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Former Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson testifies Wednesday during his confirmation hearing for U.S. secretary of state before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in Washington, D.C. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Liaoning, China's only aircraft carrier, sails during military drills in the Pacific on Dec. 24. Taiwan's defense minister warned on Dec. 27 that enemy threats were growing daily after China's aircraft carrier and a flotilla of other warships passed south of the island in an exercise. On Wednesday, the carrier traveled through the Taiwan Strait. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen, center, is escorted by security staff before departing from Taoyuan airport on Saturday. Tsai Ing-wen left for the United States on her way to Central America, a trip that will be closely watched by Beijing. Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images

A user in Beijing looks at The New York Times app on an iPhone. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

Apple Pulls 'The New York Times' From Its App Store In China

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People wearing protective masks walk near the iconic headquarters of Chinese state broadcaster Central China Television in Beijing, which has been blanketed by heavy smog. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

People in Shanghai overlook the financial district in June 2016. The Shanghai city government recently released an app that produces a "public credit score" for residents. A good score can lead to discounts, but a bad score can cause problems. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

What's Your 'Public Credit Score'? The Shanghai Government Can Tell You

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