China China

Samantha Power, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, says the proposed resolution sanctioning North Korea "is the toughest sanctions resolution that has been put forward in more than two decades." Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

U.S. Proposes Tough New Sanctions On North Korea — With China's Support

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Customers browse books on Chinese politics by Mighty Current, the publisher that has seen five of its booksellers disappear, at a stall set up by political activists in Hong Kong on Feb. 5. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

A Chilling Effect As Hong Kong's Missing Bookseller Cases Go Unresolved

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The counterfeit site coolsound.co doesn't say where the company is based. But the source code behind the site reveals tracking cookies from China. coolsound.co / Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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coolsound.co / Screenshot by NPR

How Major Chinese Banks Help Sell Knock-Offs

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Students take part in a protest at the University of Hong Kong on Jan. 20. They protested after a pro-Beijing official was appointed to a senior role, amid growing worry over increasing political interference in academia. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

In Hong Kong, A Tussle Over Academic Freedom

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Football has practically no history in China. Some of China's most popular sports are individual ones that don't involve physical contact, like pingpong and badminton. Chinese players say football provides an opportunity to release their aggression. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Far From Sunday's Super Bowl, A Football Championship In China

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Paul Tang, owner of the People's Bookstore in Hong Kong, is still selling works that are critical of the Chinese leadership and are banned on the mainland. Five people in the Hong Kong book industry disappeared recently. Some have turned up in police custody on the mainland. But Tang says he isn't particularly worried about his safety. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

The Hong Kong Bookseller Who's Keeping 'Banned' Books On His Shelves

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

How China's One-Child Policy Led To Forced Abortions, 30 Million Bachelors

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The Buick Envision, built in China, was on display at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. It will soon go on sale in the U.S. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

With Growing Investments, China's Influence In Autos Is Expanding

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Qiao Guohua patrols a 5-mile stretch of the Great Wall of China. Roughly a third of the wall's 12,000 miles have crumbled to dust, and saving what's left may be the world's greatest challenge in cultural preservation. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

China's Great Wall Is Crumbling In Many Places; Can It Be Saved?

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Patrons of the the New World Mall in Flushing ride the escalator from the food court. The Queens neighborhood has become a hot spot for northern Chinese immigrants in the past few years. The trend has brought a cultural wave of influence on the food and business markets in the community. Cameron Robert/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Robert/NPR

Leaving China's North, Immigrants Redefine Chinese In New York

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Sophomore Morgan Wang (center) takes part in a rehearsal of The Miser at Arroyo Pacific Academy in Arcadia, Calif., last November. Wang plays Marianne in the play. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Growing Numbers Of Chinese Teens Are Coming To America For High School

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