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A steel mill in Tangshan, in China's Hebei province. U.S. Steel claims that the Chinese government dumps steel at unfair prices and uses computer hackers to steal intellectual property. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese officials answer questions about a new law regulating overseas nongovernmental organizations during a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday. The new law subjects NGOs to close police supervision. "We welcome and support all foreign NGOs to come to China to conduct friendly exchanges," one official said. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control

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Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse

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At a Chinese hospital, a woman holds her child, who's receiving a rabies vaccine after being scratched by a cat. Vaccines against rabies were among the millions that were part of a newly discovered racket, reselling vaccines that hadn't been refrigerated. VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/Getty Images

Why Chinese Parents Don't Necessarily Trust Childhood Vaccines

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Apple's online movie and book services have been closed down in China — reportedly on the orders of Chinese censors. Here, an Apple Store in Shenyang is decorated for Earth Day this week. VCG via Getty Image hide caption

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VCG via Getty Image

President Obama met with China's president, Xi Jinping, at an event linked to the international climate conference held late last year outside Paris. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Can The U.S. And China Keep Their Climate Pledges?

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A worker stokes a burning cauldron at a steel mill in Hefei, in eastern China's Anhui province in 2011. Chinese steelmakers are overproducing, hurting prices and jobs, U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker says. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Wang Mao-lin, Taiwan's coast guard commander for the Spratly Islands, speaks next to an image of Taiping Island during a visit by journalists to the island on March 23. The island, claimed by Taiwan, is one of many that are dispute in the South China Sea. Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images

Sun Wenlin (left) and his partner, Hu Mingliang, hold hands as they arrive at the Furong District Court in Changsha to argue in China's first same-sex marriage case. Gerry Shih/AP hide caption

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Gerry Shih/AP

Members of the Chinese navy stand guard on China's first aircraft carrier, Liaoning, in 2013. Tensions in the South China Sea have grown over territorial disputes between China, the Philippines, Japan, Vietnam and others. Reuters/China Stringer Network/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/China Stringer Network/Landov

Who Owns The South China Sea?

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Jenna Cook created this poster when she left her home in Massachusetts in 2012 to return to Wuhan, China, where she had been abandoned as a baby. She hoped a relative might see the poster. She ended up meeting with 50 families who thought she might be their daughter. Courtesy of Jenna Cook hide caption

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Courtesy of Jenna Cook

Her Search For Her Mother Touches An Entire Chinese City

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The Shanghai Rowing Club (middle) was rescued after preservationists fought a proposed demolition. In the background to the left is the futuristic skyline of Shanghai's financial district, Lujiazui. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

After Decades, A Shanghai Preservationist Heads Home To America

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Shanghai has long had an active nightlife culture ranging from jazz clubs to — more recently — bars focused on mixology. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

'Shanghai Nightscapes': Dancing, Drinking And All That Jazz

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