China China

People walk on the Bund, the riverfront area next to the financial district in Shanghai. Many foreigners have descended on Shanghai to make money on China's economic expansion. NPR's Frank Langfitt met one such woman as part of the free taxi rides he's been offering. Aly Song/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Aly Song/Reuters/Landov

Single Mom Leads Double Life On The Streets Of Shanghai

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/418651793/418924590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NPR's Frank Langfitt has been offering free taxi rides around Shanghai to talk to ordinary Chinese. He drives a Camry around the city, but rented a van for a trip 500 miles outside the city earlier this year. He recently decided to buy a car, which can be a complicated process in China. Yang Zhuo for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Yang Zhuo for NPR

Would You Buy A Used Car From A Man Named Beer Horse?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/418299326/418776168" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Zhou Qiang, president of the Supreme People's Court of China, speaks to the National People's Congress in Beijing on March 12. Chinese authorities are waging a major campaign against corruption, and that includes a list of 100 suspects believed to be overseas. Many are former officials who are thought to have fled to the U.S. or Canada. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

When Corrupt Chinese Officials Flee, The U.S. Is A Top Destination

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/416828057/417099715" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sun Jianguo (left), from the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy, chats with U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter in May during the ministerial luncheon at the 14th Asia Security Summit in Singapore. Each country has grown increasingly wary of the other's actions and interests in the South China Sea. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

China's Island-Building Has Neighbors On Edge, But Tensions May Be Easing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/416665830/416736971" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Supporters of free and open elections in Hong Kong march through the city streets ahead of a crucial vote on political reform in the city's Legislative Council. Alex Hoffard/EPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Hoffard/EPA/Landov

Supporters of free and open elections in Hong Kong march through the city streets ahead of a crucial vote on political reform in the city's Legislative Council. Alex Hoffard/EPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Hoffard/EPA/Landov

A 2012 photo of Zhou Yongkang, the then-Chinese Communist Party Politburo Standing Committee member in charge of security. Zhou has been sentenced to life in prison over charges of corruption. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lee Jin-man/AP

A woman smokes a cigarette in a Beijing shopping market, even though the practice is now banned inside public spaces. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

How Does A City Stop 4 Million Smokers From Lighting Up?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/413318065/413318066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A relative of passengers on board the Eastern Star cruise ship is comforted by a man along the Yangtze River's banks in Jianli, China. Relatives of people missing after the cruise ship capsized have gathered at the disaster site. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images

Relatives await word of survivors from a cruise ship that capsized in the Yangtze River. The Eastern Star was carrying more than 450 people; only 14 have been rescued. China Stringer Network/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
China Stringer Network/Reuters/Landov

Since the first case on May 20, confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, have swelled to at least 30 in South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Classes Canceled, 1,300 Quarantined In S. Korea's Scramble To Stop MERS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/411638314/411660273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wang, a young human rights lawyer, argues that Chinese people have to push the government to build a system of rule of law. She did not want her full face shown to protect her identity. Frank Langfitt / NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Frank Langfitt / NPR

A Rare, Spontaneous Democracy Debate In A Shanghai Taxi

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/410550176/411271222" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript