A corn purchaser writes on his account in northwest China in 2012. In November 2013, officials began rejecting imports of U.S. corn when they detected traces of a new gene not yet approved in China. Peng Zhaozhi/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Passengers packed the waiting hall Tuesday at Hongqiao Railway Station, which services a terminal at Shanghai Hongqiao International Airport. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zhou Yongkang, who at the time was Chinese Communist Party Politburo Standing Committee member in charge of security, attends a plenary session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China in 2012. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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A U.S. company that supplies meat to some fast-food chains in China has pulled all of its products, some of which were chicken nuggets sold in Hong Kong, made by a Chinese subsidiary. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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China Central Television anchor Rui Chenggang is the latest high-profile person to be arrested in China's massive anti-corruption drive. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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News Anchor On Losing Side Of China's Anti-Corruption Campaign
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Police remove a protester during a pro-democracy rally early on July 2 in Hong Kong. Frustration is growing over the influence of Beijing on the city and its press. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Violence And Other Threats Raise Press Freedom Fears In Hong Kong
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A man looks at the painting Better To Have Only One Child at the China National Art Museum in Beijing. More than three decades after China's one-child policy took hold, some bereaved parents are suffering an unintended consequence of the policy: The loss of a child leaves them with no support in their old age. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Losing An Only Child, Chinese Parents Face Old Age Alone
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Apartments are still under construction in Wuxi, outside Shanghai, despite a glut in the market and almost no local demand. This development is to have 2,500 residential units. PR Newswire Via AP hide caption

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China's Booming Real Estate Market Finally Begins To Slide
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Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) and South Korean President Park Geun-hye greet children waving the two countries' national flags at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on Thursday. Xi has yet to visit North Korea. Kim Hong-ji/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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