Gigi Chao (right) daughter of Hong Kong property tycoon Cecil Chao, poses with her partner, Sean Eav, at an event in Hong Kong. AP hide caption

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The Chinese flag is seen in front of a view of the moon at Beijing's Tiananmen Square in December, when China's first moon rover touched the lunar surface. That feat was widely celebrated — but observers believe the rover has now run into serious trouble. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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China's Jade Rabbit Rover May Be Doomed On The Moon

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Wuhan, in central China, is in debt to the tune of a reported $33 billion — nearly twice the city's GDP. This 17-mile highway sat dormant for two years after banks cut off funding as Wuhan's debt ballooned. Work on the road resumed last year, but the construction company still hasn't been paid. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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In China's Hugely Indebted Cities, Some Big Bills Are Coming Due

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A vendor sells chickens at the Kowloon City Market in Hong Kong last month. As a precautionary measure against the deadly H7N9 virus, Hong Kong has temporarily stopped importing poultry from mainland farms. Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images hide caption

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Qiu Xiaolong in his ancestral house during a visit from his home in St. Louis. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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In Fast-Changing China, Reality Can Overtake Fiction

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, left, follows a Shinto priest during his visit to the Yasukuni shrine in Tokyo on Thursday. Franck Robichon /EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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