Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told a CBC radio show that his father, former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, who died in 2000, had prostate cancer and Parkinson's disease. He said his father would have liked to end his life with dignity. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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The isolated Cree community of Attawapiskat — shown several years ago, in a photo by the Toronto Star — struggled all winter with a high rate of suicide attempts. Spencer Wynn/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walk from the Oval Office to a joint press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House on Thursday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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The prime minister's official residence at 24 Sussex Drive in Ottawa is drafty and leaky, and just about every part of it needs to be repaired. Margaret Trudeau, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's mother, calls it "the crown jewel of the federal penitentiary system." National Capital Commission/Flickr hide caption

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Canada's Official Residence, No Longer Fit For A Prime Minister

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Justin Trudeau won in a landslide as Canada's prime minister in October. But critics say he is more flashy than substantive. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Trudeau, The 'Shiny Pony' Who Became Canada's Prime Minister

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Reemas al-Abdullah, 5, wrapped herself in a Canadian flag before a dinner hosted by Friends of Syria at the Toronto Port Authority in December. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Lita Blacksmith displays a drawing she made of her 18-year-old daughter Lorna, who was murdered in Winnipeg in 2012. A police study found that 1 in 4 female homicide victims in Canada in 2012 was an aboriginal woman. Jim Rankin/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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An adult spirit bear crosses a fallen log over a stream in the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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A customer fills up at a gas station in Chillicothe, Ill., in December. Low prices have meant big savings for consumers, but urban planners worry that cheap gas will encourage sprawl. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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$1.22 A Gallon: Cheap Gas Raises Fears Of Urban Sprawl

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Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomed Syrian refugees arriving from Beirut at the Toronto airport last week. Mark Blinch/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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As Syrian Refugees Reach Canada, Many Are Pitching In

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Shell's Jack Pine Mine near Fort MacKay, Alberta. The largest trucks, called "heavy haulers," can hold 400 tons of oil sands material. It takes 2 tons to produce one barrel of oil. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Between Cheap Gas And Carbon Caps, Oil Sands Face Uncertain Fate

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Canada has pledged to accept 25,000 Syrian refugees, likely including women, children and injured people who have been living in camps in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Here, children stand outside their tents during a sandstorm, in a refugee camp in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in September. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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