Waze is a traffic app that relies on users' feedback about road conditions to find the quickest possible route. Ruby Wallau/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ruby Wallau/NPR

The Road Less Traveled? Not Since Waze Came To Los Angeles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481871496/481914478" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As varied as the options are for apps that are available to help you navigate your daily commute, the future of GPS may be more accurate. Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Lizzie Roberts/Ikon Images/Corbis

The Tech Behind Traffic Apps: How (Well) Do They Work?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/407658702/407749373" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Unless there's a serious pileup, ants in traffic tend to bypass a collision and just keep going. A physicist has found a way to model this behavior with a mathematical equation. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Why Ants Handle Traffic Better Than You Do

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/377743242/378289404" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

MMDA (Metro Manila Development Authority) traffic enforcers patrol a street on their Segway vehicles in a 2011 photo. During a visit by Pope Francis next week, they are being asked to wear adult diapers so they won't have to leave their posts. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

toggle caption Bullit Marquez/AP

Traffic engineers face "a new conundrum" in dealing with red-light cameras such as this one in New Mexico, according to a recent study looking at how cameras are operated and the perception that they are used to generate revenue. Susan Montoya Bryan/AP hide caption

toggle caption Susan Montoya Bryan/AP