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A new disclosure from Yahoo — now known as Oath after it was bought by telecom company Verizon — dramatically escalates the size of the 2013 hack revealed last year. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, seen in 2014, wrote a farewell post to employees titled "Nostalgia, Gratitude & Optimism." She signed off with: "Yaho-o-oo! Marissa." Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

AOL CEO Tim Armstrong will take the same position at the head of Verizon's Oath. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Yahoo And AOL Move In Together Under 'Oath,' Verizon's New Digital Arm

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Yahoo says it has notified an undisclosed number of users that their private information may have been accessed using forged cookies in connection with a previously disclosed hack in 2014. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

A Yahoo sign at the company's headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif. The company has announced a hacking of user accounts that happened in 2013, but it says payment card information was not accessed. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Verizon's Metamorphosis: Can You See Me As A Tech Giant Now?

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Yahoo President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote during the Yahoo Mobile Developers Conference on Feb. 18, in San Francisco. Stephen Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Getty Images

Is There A Double Standard When Female CEOs In Tech Stumble?

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Yahoo President and CEO Marissa Mayer delivers a keynote address at the 2014 International CES in Las Vegas in 2014. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

CEO Marissa Mayer Treated Yahoo Like A Think Tank, Not A Sinking Ship

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Yahoo Chief Information Security Officer Bob Lord on encryption: "Yes, it's used by terrorists. It's also used by people who are looking to voice their opinions on issues and to save lives." Yahoo hide caption

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