Patricia Gallagher (from left), who first proposed the tasting; wine merchant Steven Spurrier; and influential French wine editor Odette Kahn. After the results were announced, Kahn is said to have demanded her scorecard back. "She wanted to make sure that the world didn't know what her scores were," says George Taber, the only journalist present that day. Courtesy of Bella Spurrier hide caption

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The Judgment Of Paris: The Blind Taste Test That Decanted The Wine World
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Manischewitz is closely associated with Jewish tradition, but it was once a huge crossover success. Sammy Davis Jr. was its spokesman in TV advertising. At one point, the typical drinker was described as an urban African-American man. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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People who drink in moderation tend to be better educated and more well off, which increases their odds of being healthy. Photographer: Katsiaryna Pakhoma/iStockphoto hide caption

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Bottles for sale at Passage de la Fleur, a natural wine shop in Brooklyn, N.Y. For some, natural wines must be completely unadulterated — without the use of sugar, clarifiers or other additives common in modern winemaking. Other natural winemakers, however, will use a little sulfur dioxide or added yeast to correct problems, according to Stephen Meuse, a wine buyer in Massachusetts. Andrea Shea for NPR hide caption

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At the end of Charles Dickens' 1843 classic, A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge and his long-abused employee, Bob Cratchit, enjoy a mug of Smoking Bishop. It's a drink loaded with English history, politics and class identity. Illustration by John Leech, 1817-1864. Culture Club/Getty Images hide caption

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Across India, several Christian communities prepare sweet homemade wines for the festive season from a rich array of local fruit, roots and grain. Above, a glass of golden pineapple wine. Courtesy Merwyn Mascarenhas hide caption

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A 1969 bottle of Domaine de la Romanée-Conti. Last Christmas, thieves stole $300,000 worth of fine wines from famed Napa Valley restaurant the French Laundry. Most of it was Domaine de la Romanée-Conti. Dale Cruse/Flickr hide caption

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Grand Theft Vino: Higher Wine Prices Are Attracting More Thieves
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A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine adds to the evidence that drinking a moderate amount of wine can be good for your health. iStockphoto hide caption

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A Glass Of Wine A Day May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes
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Students sort grapes at the University of California, Davis research winery. The winery is experimenting with various methods to conserve water. The hope is that commercial wineries will follow suit. Courtesy of Karen L Block/UC Davis hide caption

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Robert Blanc (left) and his brother, Didier, stand in the middle of their vineyard, Domaine Saint Firmin, near the town of Uzes, in southern France. The area is known for its rosé wine in the summertime, and Robert Blanc says American importers have come looking for theirs. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Why French Winemakers Are Seeing The World Through Rosé-Colored Glasses
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Winemaker Iago Bitarishvili makes wine in clay vessels called qvevri, which he buries underground and fills with white grapes. There are no barrels, vats or monitoring systems for this ancient Georgian method, which is helping drive sales. Bitarishvili plans to bury these new qvevri in his cellar to expand production. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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