Amber Lakin (front) and colleague Julia Porras work at Central City Concern, an organization that does outreach and job training to combat homelessness and addiction in Portland, Ore. Lakin went through the welfare system and now works with Central City Coffee, an offshoot of the main organization, which uses coffee roasting/packaging as a job training space. Leah Nash for NPR hide caption

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Leah Nash for NPR

20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

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Rep. Gwen Moore (shown in 2012) has introduced a bill that would mandate drug testing for wealthy Americans before they could claim itemized tax deductions over $150,000. She says the bill is intended not so much as a statement about the rich but about the poor. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Several states are considering measures restricting how welfare benefits can be used. In Kansas, a bill on the governor's desk will bar recipients from spending their benefits on movies, swimming or casinos, or from withdrawing more than $25 per day from ATMs. Brownie Harris/Corbis hide caption

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Brownie Harris/Corbis

On Welfare? Don't Use The Money For Movies, Say Kansas Lawmakers

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Food stamps aren't "stamps" anymore — they're debit cards. But they won't get you a trip to Hawaii. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images