Customers browse books on Chinese politics by Mighty Current, the publisher that has seen five of its booksellers disappear, at a stall set up by political activists in Hong Kong on Feb. 5. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

A Chilling Effect As Hong Kong's Missing Bookseller Cases Go Unresolved

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467787873/467841030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students take part in a protest at the University of Hong Kong on Jan. 20. They protested after a pro-Beijing official was appointed to a senior role, amid growing worry over increasing political interference in academia. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

In Hong Kong, A Tussle Over Academic Freedom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465702928/466317676" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Paul Tang, owner of the People's Bookstore in Hong Kong, is still selling works that are critical of the Chinese leadership and are banned on the mainland. Five people in the Hong Kong book industry disappeared recently. Some have turned up in police custody on the mainland. But Tang says he isn't particularly worried about his safety. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Anthony Kuhn/NPR

The Hong Kong Bookseller Who's Keeping 'Banned' Books On His Shelves

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/465284407/465387428" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters demonstrated Sunday in Hong Kong against the disappearance of five booksellers in the city. All the missing booksellers are connected to the publication of sensational books about top Chinese leaders. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

The Plot Thickens In The Mystery Of Hong Kong's Missing Booksellers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461997704/461997705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Since the first case on May 20, confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, have swelled to at least 30 in South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Classes Canceled, 1,300 Quarantined In S. Korea's Scramble To Stop MERS

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/411638314/411660273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man pushing a stroller passes parallel traders in Hong Kong distributing goods to be brought into Shenzhen, China, on Monday. China said it will limit the number of visits that residents of Shenzhen can make to Hong Kong. The move is an attempt to ease the flow of mainland visitors in the former British colony. Bobby Yip/Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Bobby Yip/Reuters /Landov

Hong Kong police arrest lawmaker and pro-democracy activist Leung Kwok-Hung during a sit-in Thursday as police clear the main protest site in the Admiralty district. Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Alex Ogle/AFP/Getty Images

A policeman clashes with pro-democracy protesters during an operation to clear an occupied road near the government headquarters in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong early on Monday. Dale de la Rey/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Dale de la Rey/AFP/Getty Images

A census by protesters estimates the main protest camp in Hong Kong is home to about 2,200 tents, but most are empty these days as crowds have dwindled. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR

After 2 Months, Hong Kong Residents Want Protesters To Head Home

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/365995044/366084607" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Floor traders study stock prices in the Hong Kong Stock Exchange in 2013. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

toggle caption Kin Cheung/AP

To Lure Investors And Move Money, China Links Two Stock Markets

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/364001651/364001652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pro-democracy protesters shout slogans during a standoff with police outside the central government offices in the Admiralty district of Hong Kong on Wednesday. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Free Speech In Hong Kong, Then And Now

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/356716672/356869648" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police forces remove pro-democracy barricades in the Causeway Bay district of Hong Kong at dawn on Tuesday. Police armed with bolt cutters, chainsaws and sledgehammers made a renewed attempt to remove barricades along a stretch of the main protest site held by pro-democracy demonstrators for the past two weeks. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

A student prays in front of a temporary altar during a rally outside government headquarters in Hong Kong on Sept. 24. Bobby Yip/Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Bobby Yip/Reuters /Landov

A Surprising Tie That Binds Hong Kong's Protest Leaders: Faith

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/354859430/354890911" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters dressed as Chinese Red Guards chant during a May demonstration in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. People from Hong Kong staged a satirical rally to urge Chinese tourists to stay in mainland China. Competition for housing, grades and jobs between the two groups have produced deep tensions. Anthony Kwan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

Economics, Tensions With Mainlanders Fuel Hong Kong's Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/354632365/354754694" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman walks past umbrellas with pro-democracy slogans written on them at a protest site near Hong Kong government headquarters on Saturday. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

toggle caption Wong Maye-E/AP

On China's Mainland, A Less Charitable Take On Hong Kong's Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/354088313/354124542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A pro-democracy protester sleeps on a concrete road divider on a street outside the Hong Kong Government Complex on Sunday in Hong Kong. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Chris McGrath/Getty Images