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The logo of Microsoft's Internet Explorer, the Web browser due to be phased out in the next version of Windows. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Microsoft Is Phasing Out Internet Explorer

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Microsoft's Clip Art has come to an end. Microsoft Office hide caption

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Microsoft Office

Microsoft Says Goodbye To Clip Art

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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella speaks at the Future Decoded conference in London on Nov. 10. The company hopes to create new social tools to increase productivity in and out of the workplace. Kevin Coombs/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Kevin Coombs/Reuters /Landov

Microsoft Wants To Mine Data Like A Social Network

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Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella addresses the media during an event in New Delhi in September. This week, he was criticized for comments he made about women asking for raises. Adnan Abidi/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Adnan Abidi/Reuters/Landov

Will Davidson and his Minecraft creation, modeled off the Santa Cruz Mission Steve Henn hide caption

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Steve Henn

Minecraft's Business Model: A Video Game That Leaves You Alone

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Satya Nadella, who's reportedly in line to be Microsoft's next CEO. Stephen Brashear/AP hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/AP

A man walks past a Microsoft billboard featuring Windows XP in November 2001 in Beijing. Kevin Lee/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Lee/Getty Images

Those are the hands of David Bradley, an original member of the IBM PC team and the inventor of the control-alt-delete function, hitting the right keys. Bob Jordan /AP hide caption

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Bob Jordan /AP