Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson

A $35 million project is underway at Monticello to re-create or restore spaces where Thomas Jefferson's slaves worked and lived. ©Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

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©Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello

Monticello Restoration Project Puts An Increased Focus On Jefferson's Slaves

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Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. John McCain (left) and Secretary of State John Kerry both continue to serve the country in official capacities after their failed presidential bids. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

All Hail The Presidential Also-Rans

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A chemical hearth recently discovered in the walls of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia dates back to its Jeffersonian origins. Dan Addison/University of Virginia Communications hide caption

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Dan Addison/University of Virginia Communications

An aerial view of Monticello shows Mulberry Row to the right of Thomas Jefferson's house. Robert Llewellyn/© Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

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Robert Llewellyn/© Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello

French physicist Philippe Hubert uses gamma rays to detect radioactivity in wine. "In the wine is the story of the Atomic Age," he says. C J Walker/Courtesy of William Koch hide caption

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C J Walker/Courtesy of William Koch

How Atomic Particles Helped Solve A Wine Fraud Mystery

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Thomas Jefferson's garden at Monticello served as an experimental laboratory for garden vegetables from around the world. Leonard Phillips/Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

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Leonard Phillips/Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello

Thomas Jefferson's Vegetable Garden: A Thing Of Beauty And Science

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