A chemical hearth recently discovered in the walls of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia dates back to its Jeffersonian origins. Dan Addison/University of Virginia Communications hide caption

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An aerial view of Monticello shows Mulberry Row to the right of Thomas Jefferson's house. Robert Llewellyn/© Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

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French physicist Philippe Hubert uses gamma rays to detect radioactivity in wine. "In the wine is the story of the Atomic Age," he says. C J Walker/Courtesy of William Koch hide caption

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How Atomic Particles Helped Solve A Wine Fraud Mystery

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Thomas Jefferson's garden at Monticello served as an experimental laboratory for garden vegetables from around the world. Leonard Phillips/Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello hide caption

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Thomas Jefferson's Vegetable Garden: A Thing Of Beauty And Science

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