West Virginia West Virginia

President Trump talks with West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice before Justice spoke during a rally Thursday in Huntington, W.Va. Justice said at the rally that he intends to switch parties and rejoin the Republicans. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

A reporter in West Virginia was arrested and charged with a crime on Tuesday after he repeatedly attempted to ask a question of Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence is seen at a rally in January in Washington, D.C., on the National Mall before the start of the 44th annual March for Life. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

(Left) Bob Hardin's son has fought alcoholism for decades. (Right) Cary Dixon's adult son has been in and out of treatment for opioid addiction. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

West Virginia Families Worry About Access To Addiction Treatment Under Trump

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After about a week in detox, the men spend 60 to 90 days in this room during their treatment at Recovery Point. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

In West Virginia, Men In Recovery Look To Trump For A 'Helping Hand'

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A student stands in one of the tiny houses created for flood victims in West Virginia. The homes, built by high school students, are fewer than 500 square feet. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

High School Students Build Tiny Houses For Flood Victims

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James Bounds is a West Virginia miner with black lung disease; it took him 4 1/2 years to get compensation benefits. A provision in Obamacare later made qualifying for those benefits much easier. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Obamacare Repeal Threatens A Health Benefit Popular In Coal Country

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Across the Ohio River from Powhatan Transportation Center — owned by Murray Energy — is a power plant that services mines in West Virginia. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Cheung/NPR

In Ohio Coal Country, Job Prospects Lie With Neither Coal Nor Trump's Promises

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Retired coal miners could face the loss of health benefits if Congress doesn't implement a fix by Friday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Retired Coal Miners At Risk Of Losing Promised Health Coverage And Pensions

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(Left to right) Executive Councilor Chris Sununu, Republican gubernatorial hopeful Lt. Gov. Phil Scott, and Indiana Lt. Gov. Eric Holcomb. Jim Cole, Wilson Ring, AJ Mast/AP hide caption

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Jim Cole, Wilson Ring, AJ Mast/AP

Workers inspect an area around storage tanks where a chemical leaked into the Elk River at Freedom Industries' storage facility in Charleston, W.Va., in January 2014. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Freedom Industries, which owned storage tanks blamed in a January 2014 chemical spill, filed for bankruptcy later that month. The company's facility on Barlow Street is seen on the banks of the Elk River in Charleston, W.Va. Tom Hindman/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Hindman/Getty Images