A small memorial marks the former homestead of the Nicely family, who died in the June flooding of White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Emotional Healing After A Flood Can Take Just As Long As Rebuilding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485544263/486063809" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mary Mullens, age 93, in her room at Edgewood Summit Retirement Community in Charleston, W.Va. Mullens is a patient of Dr. Todd Goldberg, one of only 36 geriatricians in the state. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Few Young Doctors Are Training To Care For U.S. Elderly

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481767273/484602964" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shane Altzier sweeps out the mud from the utilities office in Rainelle, W.Va., one of the towns hardest hit by floods that tore through the state on Friday. More rain this week has slowed cleanup efforts. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

West Virginia State Trooper C.S. Hartman walks from a shed that he checked out as he and other crews search homes on Saturday in Rainelle, W.Va. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

Federal prosecutors said Don Blankenship operated Massey Energy as a "lawless enterprise." He's seen here leaving a federal courthouse in Charleston, W.Va., on Nov. 17, when the jury began deliberations. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Nancy Bruns, CEO of J.Q. Dickinson Salt-Works, gathers finished salt from an evaporation table in Malden, W.Va. Noah Adams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Noah Adams for NPR

Fine Brine From Appalachia: The Fancy Mountain Salt That Chefs Prize

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/457371557/457415651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Standing next to the Coal Miner's Statue at the West Virginia Capitol in Charleston on Wednesday, James Bennett rallied alongside other speakers who criticized President Obama's proposed environmental rules that would limit carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. The rally coincided with president's visit to the state capital to talk about drug abuse. John Raby/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Raby/AP

West Virginia Tells The Story Of America's Shifting Political Climate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/451336317/451403501" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(Left) Sauerkraut and sausage (foreground) cook on the stove at the Hutte Restaurant. (Right) Diners Roxanne Singhisen and Nick Lockyer of Pittsburgh chat at the Hutte. Pat Jarrett for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Pat Jarrett for NPR