Over three years, a campaign urged Howard County, Md., residents to pare back on sugary drinks — through ads, social media, health counseling and changes to what vending machines sold. And it worked. Adrian Burke/Getty Images hide caption

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Adrian Burke/Getty Images

Tom Conner, the current owner of Conner Bottling Works, is part of the fourth generation of the family-owned business. Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio hide caption

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Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio

A screenshot from the video game Fallout 3 of a character standing near a Nuka-Cola machine. Soda machines appear in video games a lot more frequently than Jess Morrissette expected, so he decided to document this phenomenon. @decafjedi/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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@decafjedi/Screenshot by NPR

Berkeley, Calif., passed the nation's first soda tax in 2014. According to a new study, the tax has succeeded in cutting consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. But there's uncertainty about whether the effect will be permanent. Robert Galbraith/Reuters hide caption

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Robert Galbraith/Reuters

Berkeley's Soda Tax Appears To Cut Consumption Of Sugary Drinks

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Soda sales have been flattening, but the industry has stepped up marketing and lobbying, according to Marion Nestle in Soda Politics: Taking on Big Soda (And Winning). Akash Ghai/NPR hide caption

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Akash Ghai/NPR

A daily habit of sugary-sweetened drinks can boost your risk of developing the disease — even if you're not overweight. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Even If You're Lean, 1 Soda Per Day Ups Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

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A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

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California Center for Public Health Advocacy

You want that soda bottle. But it may not be because you crave soda. It might just be that you love the idea of wrapping your fingers around its enticing shape. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

When beverage companies like Pepsi create ad campaigns with stars like Beyonce, they're trying to appeal to youth, says Jennifer Harris of the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. Walter McBride/Corbis hide caption

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Walter McBride/Corbis

Berkeley's efforts to pass a penny-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks faced opposition with deep pockets — but it also got sizable cash infusions from some big-name donors. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Would you think twice about that 20-ounce soda if you were informed that it would take 5 miles of walking — or 50 minutes of running — to burn it off? Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Reality Check: To Burn Off A Soda, You'll Have To Run 50 Minutes

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A mock-up of a warning label for sodas and sugary drinks proposed in California by public health advocates. California Center for Public Health Advocacy hide caption

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California Center for Public Health Advocacy

4-MEI, a chemical created during the manufacturing of caramel color used to dye sodas brown, is under new scrutiny. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

At NPR's Sound Bites Cafe, all food gets coded with one of three circles: Green is reserved for the most healthful dishes; yellow flags the "good choices;" and red signals the high-calorie foods to grab "on occasion." NPR hide caption

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NPR

Goodbye, Sodas. McDonald's says it will now market and promote Happy Meals only with milk, water or juice. Bill Parrish Photography/PR Newswire/AP hide caption

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Bill Parrish Photography/PR Newswire/AP