Beth Cobert says cybersecurity has been boosted since she took over as acting director of the Office of Personnel Management last summer. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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One Year After OPM Data Breach, What Has The Government Learned?

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People walk past a TV screen showing a poster of Sony Picture's "The Interview" in a news report, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The FBI says North Korea hacked into Sony Pictures computer systems as retribution for the film. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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A pedestrian walks by an Apple store in New York City on Feb. 23. Protesters demonstrated against the FBI's efforts to require the company to make it easier to unlock the encrypted iPhone used by Syed Rizwan Farook. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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From Reagan's Cyber Plan To Apple Vs. FBI: 'Everything Is Up For Grabs'

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Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (left) says the Pentagon's new hacker program will strengthen America's digital defenses. Carter is seen here with the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joseph Dunford. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Authorities say several publicly traded companies, including Clorox, Caterpillar and Viacom, had press releases stolen and used to implement an insider-trading scheme. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Hackers say they took control of a Tesla Model S through the car's computers. Tesla Motors says it is updating its systems with a patch to fix the vulnerability. Tesla Motors hide caption

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Tesla Model S Can Be Hacked, And Fixed (Which Is The Real News)

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Chris Valasek (left) and Charlie Miller talk about hacking into vehicle computer systems during the Black Hat USA 2014 hacker conference in Las Vegas last August. Steve Marcus/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Adm. Michael Rogers, NSA director and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, has avoided singling out China for blame in the OPM hack, which may affect as many as 18 million federal workers. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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In Data Breach, Reluctance To Point The Finger At China

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