Owen Chilcoat hacking his tablet. "I am just messing around ... trying to break it," he says. Steve Henn /NPR hide caption

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Hacking Real Things Becomes Child's Play At This Camp
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The Toyota Prius, seen here at the New York International Auto Show in March, was one of the cars security experts Chris Valasek and Charlie Miller showed to be susceptible to attacks by hackers. Mike Segar /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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With Smarter Cars, The Doors Are Open To Hacking Dangers
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An image of the site promoting Def Con 21, a large annual gathering of hackers in Las Vegas. The meeting's leader is asking federal workers to stay away from this year's event. Def Con hide caption

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After high-profile accounts have been attacked — including AP's, NPR's and the BBC's — Twitter considers how to thwart hackers and protect users. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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As Its Influence Grows, Twitter Becomes A Hacking Target
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AP Twitter Account Hacked, Tweet About Obama Shakes Market
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This 12-story building houses a Chinese military unit allegedly behind dozens of cyberattacks on U.S. and other Western companies. It's in a modern, if bland, part of Shanghai. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An analyst works at a federal cybersecurity center in Idaho in 2011. Experts say Internet-connected infrastructure is a possible target of cyberwarfare. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Street Lights, Security Systems And Sewers? They're Hackable, Too
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Cyberattack headquarters? The 12-story building in a Shanghai suburb that American investigators say houses an operation responsible for hundreds of cyberattacks on companies around the world. Peter Parks /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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