hacking hacking

Yahoo says it has notified an undisclosed number of users that their private information may have been accessed using forged cookies in connection with a previously disclosed hack in 2014. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

Some workers in low-income countries are choosing bitcoin, a virtual currency powered by blockchain technology, to send money to their families. It's cheaper, faster and doesn't require a middleman. Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Cybersecurity presents an early challenge for the incoming president, Donald Trump. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Experts Hope Trump Makes Cybersecurity An Early Priority

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A Yahoo sign at the company's headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif. The company has announced a hacking of user accounts that happened in 2013, but it says payment card information was not accessed. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange participates via video link at a news conference in October marking the 10th anniversary of the group. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Beth Cobert says cybersecurity has been boosted since she took over as acting director of the Office of Personnel Management last summer. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

One Year After OPM Data Breach, What Has The Government Learned?

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People walk past a TV screen showing a poster of Sony Picture's "The Interview" in a news report, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The FBI says North Korea hacked into Sony Pictures computer systems as retribution for the film. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College

A pedestrian walks by an Apple store in New York City on Feb. 23. Protesters demonstrated against the FBI's efforts to require the company to make it easier to unlock the encrypted iPhone used by Syed Rizwan Farook. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

From Reagan's Cyber Plan To Apple Vs. FBI: 'Everything Is Up For Grabs'

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Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (left) says the Pentagon's new hacker program will strengthen America's digital defenses. Carter is seen here with the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joseph Dunford. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images