Hillary Clinton arrives to sign her book "Hards Choices" at a bookstore on Martha's Vineyard on August 13, 2014. According to the Clintons' 2015 tax returns, the couple earned $3.1 million from book advances and royalties. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

'Invest For Who You Are' And More Advice For Millennials' Financial Future

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Pedestrians stand outside a securities firm in Tokyo Tuesday. Stocks plunged again in Japan, and the interest rate on the benchmark bond fell below zero. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Japan Is Selling Bonds Guaranteed To Lose You Money

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Automatically enrolling workers into a savings plan and then deducting their pre-tax contribution from their paycheck means workers don't see or feel any loss. It sort of tricks our brains into doing the right thing. Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR hide caption

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Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

Why Is It So Hard To Save? U.K. Shows It Doesn't Have To Be

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Jack Bogle wants Americans to make more money in the stock market and give less away to financial firms. Courtesy of Vanguard hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanguard

The George Washington Of Investing Wants You For The Revolution

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Rick Perry ended his presidential campaign Sept. 11, but there was $13 million left in the bank of a superPAC supporting him. The superPAC says it's given donors their money back. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Demonstrators march in the snow outside the White House during a rally against the Supreme Court's decision five years ago in favor of Citizens United, which allows private citizens and corporations to make unlimited donations for political campaigns. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Curtis Carroll — also known as "Wall Street" — teaches prisoners at San Quentin State Prison about stocks. The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

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The Kitchen Sisters

Inmate With Stock Tips Wants To Be San Quentin's Warren Buffett

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A quick staff-up and a fast-paced money grab are common to both startups and campaigns. Here, staffers work at computers during a tour of President Obama's re-election headquarters in Chicago on May 12, 2010. Frank Polich/Getty Images hide caption

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More than 1 million people in Peru earn less than the equivalent of about $450 each year. Courtesy of Michael Rizzo/CGAP hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Rizzo/CGAP

What It Takes To Lift Families Out Of Poverty

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